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SGT Dave Matteson
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The German's are learning a valuable lesson about the Leopard 2. That lesson? It's not really that good for Middle Eastern warfare. The Turkish Leopard 2A5s were getting knocked out left and right. But because of this revelation they have debuted the Leopard 2A7 which was redesigned for the Middle East.
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SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
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Thank you for the interesting share sir.
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1SG Mark Flowers
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This is like trying to slice an onion with a hammer. It's a multi-faceted problem that canh't be fixed with new tanks. If the Turks were using brand-new M1s, the same thing would be happening. Essentially, the tank doesn't care where it is deployed. Every armored vehicle is a trade-off between mobility, firepower, and protection. The Leo 2A4 is no better or worse that any other tank in its class.

I've been reading about this topic in German army pubs, and their tankers are obviously very interested in the effectiveness of the Leo. The Turks typically put their tanks into long-range overwatch position to seal off the battlefield. They set their tanks on high ground and the infantry fights through built-up areas or compartmentalized terrain. Meanwhile, their tanks are essentially out there alone without much in the ways in infantry. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out what happens then.

Although they're not doing it so much anymore, the Turks also used to send their tanks alone into contested urban areas and essentially tell the tankers to shoot everything that looked hostile. That's almost a guaranteed recipe for disaster.

The lesson is one that has been learned in blood over and over. Except in very exceptional circumstances, tanks need to operate with mutual support by the infantry. It's much easier to blame an inanimate object (like a tank) then to make an honest assessment of why so many of these things are being destroyed by guys with shoulder-fired AT weapons and ATGMs.
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