Posted on Nov 26, 2023
SSG Battalion S6 Communications Ncoic
3.55K
10
8
1
1
0
Hello, everyone. I am in the US Army Reserve as a BN S6 NCOIC. I want any tips on any experience or setting up an S6 shop in the activated unit.

1. This is my first time being an NCOIC, and my OIC has recently come to a signal corp. What type of mentorship can I give him without undermining my OIC? He will come to me for mentorship, but I want to respect his position.
2. How to request an ADOS position for soldiers for their help in a US Army Reserve unit? It is just my OIC and me in the S6 section. So, I don't know how to make a position for ADOS.
3. Are there a lot of SOPs or guides on LandWar University? I want to have SOP and guides for radios, COMSECC, etc. I like these things so that my future soldiers are set up for success.
4. I am still waiting to do the inventory for my IT equipment. We are a new unit, and I haven't signed up for everything yet. So, I am still waiting to figure everything out in the future.
Any tips or mentorship would be greatly appreciated.
Avatar feed
Responses: 5
SSgt Christophe Murphy
4
4
0
You need to create a counterpart relationship with your OIC. You are both tasked with leading the S6 n your respective ways and it better to approach it as being counterparts working toward the same goal instead of a mentor/mentee relationship. You both have information that will benefit the other but getting caught up in mentor roles can cause more static than help.

The biggest thing you’ll need to ensure you are helping your customer base is check the basics. What is the process for tickets coming in/being processed? What is the process for creating/deleting accounts? Adding/removing permissions to the network? Start small and scale from there. Also make sure you know the EKMS requirements for crypto and all that.
Good luck
(4)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small
MSG Intermediate Care Technician
4
4
0
1. Figure out what his vision for the Section is. Tell him what your vision for the Section is. Then, find out what the Battalion Commander and Battalion XO have as their vision(s) for your section. Each of you establish your Lanes of Responsibility for the Section. Other than that, do what comes natural when working with Officers.

2. For ADOS, you will need to speak with the BN S3. It's not necessarily about creating an ADOS position as it's more to do with if funds are available to put someone on ADOS. Your OIC and you will need to have a sit down with the BN CO, XO, CSM, S3 OIC and NCOIC to see what is needed in relation to what can be done.

3. Get in touch with your BDE S6 NCOIC to see what they have in place. Then, mirror what they have (as much as possible) that will fit your BN.

4. Don't sign for ANYTHING until you (and/or your OIC) have eyes on everything. Definitely work with your S4/PBO. Once you (or your OIC) have signed for everything, begin to sub-hand receipt items to personnel.
(4)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small
SGT Signal Support Systems Specialist
1
1
0
Edited 2 mo ago
Start off with being familiar with your equipment. When time permits it, dedicate a day for round robin training. The last battalion I was apart of, they had 4 competent people, and they used their untrained soldiers as gophers and to do menial labor. Be very familiar with the FMs related to signal operations and have a strong sense for wave propagation. Get familiar with your OE-254s, COM-201s, and the different HF radio Antennae. VOCAP software and SPEED for building frequency planning are helpful. Hold the soldiers and sections accountable for Level 10 training. Develop a maintenance program for JBC-P devices.
(1)
Comment
(0)
SSG Battalion S6 Communications Ncoic
SSG (Join to see)
2 mo
Thank you very much. I am 25B and I haven't done much with radio. However, I know I have to change that as a NCOIC.
(0)
Reply
(0)
SGT Signal Support Systems Specialist
SGT (Join to see)
2 mo
SSG (Join to see) - Depending on the type of unit, I was assigned to an Infantry Battalion in a Stryker Brigade. The MTOE is going to be different if your Battalion is a part of an engineer, signal, intel, or aviation unit. If you are fortunate enough to do this, reach out to your local State Guard. Those guys are heavy in Signal Knowledge, generally retired military, or HAM Radio Operators. Get your 25U's throughout the Battalion footprint FCC licensed at a General Ham. Participate in radio events, too. This will increase the competency in HF Radio operations. I have to say, HF radio operations have gone to the wayside. There are so much really cool things that can be done with your radios. Please, don't hesitate to reach out to me. My email is [login to see] .mil.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close