Posted on Mar 18, 2021
SGM Police Sergeant
71.1K
26
18
5
5
0
I am digging through the ARs and PAMs and I want to show in writing the documented answer. Correct me if I am wrong, but unless awarded to the unit while assigned, after retirement neither former unit awards or unit crests are authorized to be worn by a soldier. Is there a paragraph somewhere that states that??
Avatar feed
Responses: 6
SFC Michael Hasbun
4
4
0
8ae34b6e
(4)
Comment
(0)
LTC Jason Mackay
LTC Jason Mackay
3 y
SFC Michael Hasbun - para 21-22 doesn't have an assigned DUI organization for retirees.

AR600-8-22 specifies permanent and temporary wear para 7-4 dtd 2019 (current)
7–2. Announcement of unit awards
a. All unit awards approved at HQDA will be announced and confirmed in AGOs.
b. During wartime, commanders authorized to approve unit awards will announce awards in POs of their headquarters and forward a copy (electronic preferred) of each order to Commander, U.S. Army Human Resources Command (AHRC–PDP–A), 1600 Spearhead Division Avenue, Fort Knox, KY 40122–5408. A copy (electronic preferred) of the POs will be sent to the U.S. Army Center of Military History (AAMH–FPO), 102 4th Avenue, Bldg 35 (Collins Hall), Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington DC 20319–5060. POs published to announce the award of a unit decoration will contain the citation of the award, official designation of the unit or units, and inclusive dates. These awards will be con- firmed in AGOs.
c. Commanders must ensure that unit awards that are submitted by the parent organization are coordinated with subor- dinate elements to ensure that subordinate units will not submit duplicate recommendations for unit awards.
d. An approved unit award is for the designated unit and is authorized to members of that unit who participated in the cited action. Personnel who did not participate in the designated action, but who are assigned to the cited unit, are author- ized temporary wear of the unit award. Additional information on wearing unit award emblems is contained in AR 670–1 and DA Pam 670–1.

AR670-1 Glossary echoes this
Unit award
An award made to an operating unit, which is worn by members of that unit who participated in the cited action (permanent unit award). Other personnel serving in the cited unit, but who were not assigned to the unit during the action, may be authorized temporary wear of the award (temporary unit award).
(1)
Reply
(0)
SFC Michael Hasbun
SFC Michael Hasbun
3 y
65174bb0
LTC Jason Mackay - " para 21-22 doesn't have an assigned DUI organization for retirees."
Correct, which is why they wear the one authorized on their uniform at the time of retirement. The DA PAM specifially authorizes DUI's for wear on civilian attire for retirees, I'm not sure why you think they would have to remove it from their uniforms.

EXAMPLE: You'll see former servicemembers and retiree's wearing their former DUI on their uniforms for every picture at Medal Of Honor presentations. If the Department of Defense protocol offfice, which goes over their unforms with a fine tooth comb before the ceremony, clearly thinks they are entilted to wear it, and nothing in the regulation contradicts that, there really isn't an argument to be me made that you're right and the Department of Defense is wrong.
(2)
Reply
(0)
LTC Jason Mackay
LTC Jason Mackay
3 y
SFC Michael Hasbun -
23–5. Medal of Honor recipients
Personnel awarded the Medal of Honor may wear the Army uniform at their pleasure, except under the circumstances in paragraph 3–7k.

President also gave him a mulligan on appearance for the event. The G1 likely cuts some ETP to cover this.
(0)
Reply
(0)
SFC Michael Hasbun
SFC Michael Hasbun
3 y
LTC Jason Mackay - LOL... Please produce that ETP or acknowledge that you're just making stuff up at this point because you hate being wrong.
(1)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
SGM Bill Frazer
3
3
0
Unit Awards- concur, because if you were not in the unit when awarded, when you leave that unit the unit award goes away. Unit crest are different- My Regiment affiliation is the 325 AIR, I was there for 14 yrs., and was there when the Army Re=designated it a regiment again. Therefore I wear it.
(3)
Comment
(0)
SFC Casey O'Mally
SFC Casey O'Mally
3 y
SGM,

There is a difference between RDI and DUI. For some units, especially in combat arms, the RDI *IS* the DUI. But, there is a spot on the uniform for RDI (chest) and a spot for the DUI (shoulder/beret). The RDI is permanent, and will continue to be worn. The DUI is specifically for current unit affiliation. Therefore, even if your last DUI was the same as your RDI, those shoulder insignia come off.

(My RDI is a Polar Bear for the 31st Infantry. That stayed the same, no matter what unit I was in. My Shoulder insignia and beret flash changed from unit to unit. Now that I am retired, the only thing that is still there is my bright and shiny polar bear.)
(2)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
SFC Shawn Warren
2
2
0
SGM Merle Bragg, very insightful question. BLUF! There is a document that gives retirees clear and definitive guidance on wearing the Army uniforms and all associated accoutrements.
See US Army Retired Solider Handbook 2021.
Pg. 14, CH 3: Military Status
3-10. Wearing of the Uniform
a), b), c) 1), 2), 3), 4), 5), 6)
After c) 6) SGM, I think this will resolve your questions concerning unit awards and unit crests.
"Retired personnel on active duty will wear their uniform and insignia in the same manner as prescribed for personnel in the Active Army of corresponding grade and branch."
Also, SGM I would point you to the final guidance on page 15.
"The guidance above is summarized from Army Regulation 670-1, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, and Department of the Army Pamphlet 670-1, Guide to the Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia."

SFC Shawn Mark Warren, USA, RET.
Antrorsum Hostium and Semper Prorsum!
Front Toward the Enemy and Always Forward!
(2)
Comment
(0)
LTC Family Physician
LTC (Join to see)
7 mo
Thank you SFC,
As a retiree I was not aware of this Handbook. It's a great resource!

Martin Abbinanti, LTC (USA Retired)
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close