Posted on Jan 7, 2020
Ope Oguntoyinbo
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Hello Everyone and Happy New Year!, Thank you for constantly answering my questions as basic as some of them may seem... Awesome platform!

My question is... As a serving US Army Reserve Officer with the US Army Medical Corps (as a Social Worker for example) , do you get normal work hours like 9-5, or 8-5? Since Reserve Officers can additionally take civilian jobs, is there a possibility of a US Army Reserve Social Worker of taking a civilian job (if any?)with the Department of the Army?

If Not, What would be the best option?
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Responses: 7
LTC Program Manager
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Yes, you'll need a job between Drills, AT and Deployments.
I don't know about Social Work but I am an Army Reserve officer and also an Army Civilian Employee.
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LTC John Griscom
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Department of the Army is not your only option. depending on your location, VA often has jobs for social workers. Lots of civil service jobs out there since many civilians are aging out and retiring.
I am retired MSC and had 26 years civil service and non-medical jobs.
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LTC Jason Mackay
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Edited >1 y ago
Your weekend drills (battle assembly) and training periods you can plan on not being available to your employer. You need the get clock punching hours out of your lexicon as an Army officer. There is a whole body of law that articulates the relationship between you, your Reserve commitment to the USAR, and employers. They have to let you go to your official reserve duty.

Can you work as a government employee. If you are a social worker working in that licensed capacity, you may be a DHA employee. This all depends if you get hired or not. But yes, you can work as a government employee including DA and DoD.

You need to also understand potential emergency recall / deployment parts of a government civilian position that may interfere with your res eve obligations. It's not hidden, it will be a part of the full job description.
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