Posted on Jan 22, 2019
Michael Jenkins
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So, I talked to an army recuriter, and we had a good conversation.. But an issue came up that would effect my chances of joining the Army: Self harm..
He said that any self-harm cuts would immediately make me MEPS disqualified, and sadly I don't have too many medical forms that show I'm okay.
But the last time I cut myself was in 8th grade (3 years, now) and it was more of a cry for help rather than suicide issues..
I asked the recruiter if I can write a letter to the people who confirm military entry or not, and he's NEVER gotten back to me (it has been months, now!)
What can I do about this? I've wanted to serve since I was in 1st grade..
Thank you!

UPDATE: As stated above, the self-afflictions were made more for a CRY FOR HELP, there was NO ISSUE with Mental stability or depression.
Edited 3 y ago
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Responses: 10
SFC Retention Operations Nco
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The Army announced about a year ago that they would let people in with a history of self harm. They got so much backlash that they immediately withdrew the decision. The recruiter hadn't gotten back with you because there's nothing he can do.
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LTC Self Employed
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I told this potential recruits to join police explorers and take as much college education as you can. I told him to join ROTC and maybe if he tries to join as an officer later in life with a college degree and a proven track record they may accept him. Am I basic training class in 1994, we did have a recruit who try to take isopropyl alcohol to get out of basic training. He did not die but we saw him chaptered out very shortly thereafter.
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MSG Dan Castaneda
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Well here's a lesson for you. Stupid decisions have life long consequences.
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MSgt Michael Smith
MSgt Michael Smith
3 y
I'm going to put this in here --it's really shitty to attack a person over what is a symptom of a mental illness. Self-harm isn't just a 'stupid choice' any more than choosing to be depressed, anxious, etc. It's a symptom of an underlying mental illness. It needs to be treated, not disciplined.
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MSG Dan Castaneda
MSG Dan Castaneda
3 y
MSgt Michael Smith - While I concur with your statement, I was not trying to discipline this kid with my statement. With that being said, if he has already experienced mental illness of any type, the military is not the place he should want to go. He has no idea what is in store for him. Someone with some compassion can enlighten him nicely, I myself am here to tell the truth regardless of how harsh it may sound.
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Michael Jenkins
Michael Jenkins
3 y
There is no problem with MENTAL ILLNESS with me, as stated above (or I believe I've stated above) it was more of a cry for help.. Not depression or any of the type.
My help was found by God, and have been cleared of this for about 4 years, now.
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MSG Dan Castaneda
MSG Dan Castaneda
3 y
Michael Jenkins - That's great Michael. I am a man of faith as well. However, your true faith may or may have yet to be actually tested. I hope you never see or have to do the things that I've seen and done. Yet I've still seen the strongest men this nation has produced collapse in the after math. I'm not saying there's no place for you in the military. If you do get a chance, choose your job wisely. In my field we look for the very best both physically and mentally. Why? Because they are going to be used until they are broken physically, emotionally, and psychologically. Talk to the Air Force. They may have some good jobs for you.
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LTC Self Employed
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Here is my own personal experience and it may not be applicable. I applied for the Army National Guard at age 31. I was applying for military police. In the screening process I had admitted that I smoked pot three times periods the last time I had smoked pot had been over six years before. I was 31 years old, had a bachelor's degree and I was worried because the security officer in my in-processing was concerned about that Honesty on my part. When I arrived to my basic training Battalion, the sergeant major or nobody else ever brought this up to me. Ended up graduating from basic training. What I would say to do is to pursue something in the civilian side like Police Explorers, getting some kind of Reserve or full-time law enforcement credentials. I also would suggest you try to get a college degree first. They are so worried about wasting so much money and they have had soldiers commit suicide or threatened to commit suicide in basic training.
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