Posted on Nov 17, 2013
SSG Student
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Currently, I have been deployed for about 7 months and our unit is nearing the end of this tour. I have done a great job at going to the gym, completing coorespondance in my off time etc.

What are some of the best ways to not only eat up the calendar but, not become complacent in the final months of your deployment?
Posted in these groups: Imgres Deployment
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Responses: 6
SFC Information Assurance Ncoic
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You have to continue to follow your deployment schedule and not develop the attitude of I can miss one day.  Keep doing what you've been doing and try not to think of it as the end of the Deployment.  Avoid short timers attitude at all costs.
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SSG Student
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9 y

Thats exactly what I was trying to avoid was short timers. I know missing a day only makes it harder to start back up again. Kind of like when running in a formation you stop running once it makes it easier to stop running again.

Thanks for the encouragement SFC!

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SFC Division Spectrum Chief
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Change up your workout routine. Have you completed SSD, maxe correspondence courses. college? Are there any MOS related certifications that you can complete? You can go online to the ACT and complete your IDP. Do you plan on staying in your current unit or have you started working your next assignment? There are always things that you can accomplish.
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SSG Student
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9 y

I have completed SSD, I maxxed out my Coorespondace as well. I attempted to identify Military Education classes online but found that most if not all are residency only. I am also a full-time college student. Classes end here in 2 weeks for me. I am not so familiar with ACT. the few times I logged in i couldnt figure out how to find the IDP nor if I had to register for classes or they would automatically update based on my MOS and current completion status' of the training I have had.

 

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SGT William B.
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Train and read everything you can about different parts of the world.  While yes, conventional warfare akin to past wars is certainly a possibility, the likelihood of becoming embroiled in another conflict centered upon establishing legitimate governance and counter-insurgency operations is much more likely, in my opinion.  Read FM 3-24, Counter-Insurgency, which again in my humble opinion, is the greatest Army field manual ever written.  From second-hand accounts and reading lessons learned over the past twelve (almost thirteen) years, we as a military were consistently woefully under-prepared for establishing a state after toppling the previous regimes.

By reading more about the different styles of governance, cultures, customs, etc., you can better prepare yourself to be an expert in that area should the need to deploy there arise in the future.  The strategic focus mainstays like Europe and South Korea will almost certainly continue to be an emphasis in our foreign policy decisions and military posture, but take notice of other opportunities, such as the African continent and the Philippines.  Learn everything you can about them, because ultimately, we (again, in my opinion) will not achieve a true victory over our enemies in OEF because we only learned how to destroy a government and its people, instead of how to raise them up and make them self-sufficient.  Note that it is also incredibly important to quickly lose your biases and prejudices against people of other nationalities, races, ethnicities, tribes, religious beliefs, etc.  It's hard to sell the idea that you are there to help them if you or your soldiers alienate them through belittling them, their culture, etc.  Also make sure your joes understand that those same prejudices and the proliferation thereof is completely unacceptable.

Learning other skills and acquiring more diverse skillsets is an incredibly healthy thing to do as well.  In your particular field, there is an incredible amount of diversity that you can achieve if you choose to.  Some of the guys I work with in Bagram are brilliant in so many ways than just what the Army taught them, and the importance of learning to leverage those unanticipated strengths with your unit's needs or the capabilities of your troops cannot be stressed enough.

BLUF: Learn everything you can; knowledge truly is power, and combined with experience.  As one of my favorite author's wrote: "Specialization is for insects."
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SSG Student
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FM-3-24 sounds like a good read, and your right another military conflict in the near future does seem more predicatable than not.
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