Posted on Mar 31, 2015
SSG(P) Instructor
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This question has several fronts and reasons.
Becoming a military officer is one of the most respected positions in the US.
The military officer earns his respect, and is respected with titles like, Sir and Captain....all that stops when you end your career.

Is it more difficult for an officer to transition to civilian life then the difficulty an enlisted person would experience? We live in a very disrespectful society, and I would imagine there are a dozen situations per year where you would want to choke someone by the way they are acting or being overtly disrespectful.
"Sir", the official greeting is a title of yesteryear...no one uses that any more...unless you grew up in the south. Manners and etiquette have all been brushed aside in an attempt to level the playing field, not make any one man better than another. Not all officers are arrogant, but again is transitioning to civilian world difficult because you spent 20,30,40 years being respected because of your title and position and decision-making power? Just curious...seems like it would. Obviously this is for officers that have over 20 or more years under their belt. I wonder how many retired officers are on RP?
Posted in these groups: Military civilian 600x338 Transition
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CSM Brigade Operations (S3) Sergeant Major
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Officers
LOL!
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Capt Richard I P.
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I mean no disrespect whatsoever, but this consideration helped drive my thinking about transitioning at 8 years vs 20.
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SSG(P) Instructor
SSG(P) (Join to see)
9 y
Elaborate Sir, did it work. I had trouble transitioning to civilian work after only 7 yrs, 3 month in the Suck....so can't imagine 20 years....but as a Reservist now, at 18.5 yrs it's been a lot easier.
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Capt Richard I P.
Capt Richard I P.
9 y
SSG(P) (Join to see) Unfortunately I can't yet elaborate on any success. I have yet to execute separation so right now its a theory only. I do subscribe to the idea that the longer you do things in one way the harder it is to change that. Old dogs and new tricks. I know now I am spoiled by the high quality of people I work with and that I am given more credit off the bat than I would be based solely on my appearance (the only real qualifier in a cold meet in the civilian world) than I will be in the 'real world.' I have broader tools to reward and punish and a better sense of dedication to mission. I'm going to lose a lot of those.

I'm going to transition, so are we all, whether after 4 years or 30 we all transition back to the 'real' world. I'm worried if I don't do it now it will be much harder later, and I'm worried people on the outside will look at me as institutionalized and not worth re-training. Now, I've got some valuable experience but I'm young enough to learn new tricks and bring value to your company for years to come.
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MSG Brad Sand
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While I can not speak for the officers, I do not think it is any more difficult for an officer than for an NCO...maybe different, but not more difficult.
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SSG(P) Instructor
SSG(P) (Join to see)
9 y
A lifer will always have some difficulty adjusting..m
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MSG Brad Sand
MSG Brad Sand
9 y
@SSG (P) Michael LoGiudice DC

Short timers and lifers each have their challenges...they are just different. For me, the retirement hitting the bank each month...today...it made things a bit simpler, but I still remember walking into a classroom and thinking "WTF, don't these students know they are supposed to stand up...oh yeah, they don't do that anymore."

I still find it hard to explain to people about what the veteran is bring to the table. They just don't get it.
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