Posted on Jul 15, 2016
SP5 Mark Kuzinski
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A1824861
Scuttle in the Professional Counseling world is that insurance coverage is becoming more liberal for Military Mental Health issues. In addition, Professional Counselors are being encouraged to get advanced training in PTSD. Have these changes gone far enough?
Edited >1 y ago
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Responses: 11
LTC Stephen C.
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SP5 Mark Kuzinski, I was in the group health insurance industry for over 25 years. Mental health coverage was always a carefully controlled benefit. Controls included copays, maximum numbers of visits and maximums with respect to dollars spent. Employers had to balance between their moral obligation to provide mental health coverage and their ability to pay for it (including employee contributions).
The saying at the time was (maybe still is), "When does an employee get well from a mental health condition?" The answer was, "When their benefits run out!"
Ultimately, the situation remains unchanged. If mental health coverage increases, the costs will increase correspondingly.
Frankly, if any group deserves increased mental health coverage, it's our armed services. However, the issues will still be how much coverage is to be provided, based upon the monies that are budgeted. COL Mikel J. Burroughs SSgt (Join to see) Maj Kim P.
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LTC Stephen C.
LTC Stephen C.
>1 y
SPC Jeff Daley, PhD, I can only assume that these unlimited mental health benefits are delivered in a managed care environment, where visits are controlled via a referral process. However, I've been away from the group health insurance industry since early 2003, so there may be new methods for providing such care at an affordable cost of which I'm not aware.
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SP5 Mark Kuzinski
SP5 Mark Kuzinski
>1 y
LTC Stephen C. - You’re response is particularly meaningful in light of your experience with the insurance industry. I have a friend who is a Licensed Professional Counselor. He feels the industry is still sadly negligent in responding to Military needs. Furthermore, he believes more encouragement should be given to military personnel, particularly those actively involved in combat, to seek professional help. He fears the “macho” image still prevalent, and possibly necessary, is keeping many from receiving the help they need and deserve. Thank you again for your response and your endorsement of more support for our fellow military people.

SPC Jeff Daley, PhD LTC Stephen F.
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LTC Stephen F.
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Mental Health is a pithy term which covers an amazing array of diseases, issues and associated stigmas SP5 Mark Kuzinski.
Military mental health issues stretch across the breadth and depth of mental health issues from phobias to psychosis. TBI and PTSD range from the relatively mild sporadic symptoms to severe continual symptoms.
Increased coverage of any group comes with costs. If the resources are stable increased support to one group means decreased support elsewhere. In this age increased coverage translates to increased cost and perhaps increased copays.
I concur with LTC Stephen C.'s responses as somebody who is familiar with the industry and a trustworthy friend.
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SMSgt Dr. G. A. Thomas
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Thanks for sharing
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