Posted on Dec 15, 2015
SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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I've never looked at athletes being compared to the military when transitioning from their sporting or military careers. I can see the reasoning behind this, but I don't think it's much different than a career civilian job when that person retires. After I retired, I sat around the house thinking about what do I do now. All of my friends were working or busy with their families lives. It took a while and I began reaching out to find something to keep me busy, and that I enjoyed doing. I think retiring from a lifelong career affects us in the same way as an athlete retiring. What do you think Rally Point community?

The Link:
http://taskandpurpose.com/veterans-and-pro-athletes-face-similar-challenges-returning-to-normal-life/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=tp-today
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Many service members and athletes find that their careers become their identities. Once it come times to transition, however, the return to normal, daily life can seem impossible.

The drive that stems from teamwork in both the military and in sports is one that is not understood by most.

“When they go to war or when they do exercises, they work as a team,” former NHL player Clint Malarchuk said in an interview with Task & Purpose earlier this year. “With that team you develop that camaraderie. We’re all the same that way. I think that’s what you develop in a team atmosphere, both in sports and in the military, so there are a lot of parallels.”
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SGT Chris Hill
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Yes, it must be difficult to leave your previous professional athletic career with deep pockets. In all seriousness, this article is crap. Although yes, athletes can receive major injuries, is nothing of the same compared to combat related injuries. The military is a major change in lifestyle, and transitioning back to civilian life differs for everyone, and in my own opinion, the more years you serve, the more difficult it could be to transition completely. NFL, NHL, NBA, etc, you're leaving with plenty of money, no combat related PTSD, college degree, fans/supporters, fame, the list could go on.
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SGT Chris Hill
SGT Chris Hill
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PO1 (Join to see) I respectfully believe you and I just have two completely different military experiences which concludes "agree to disagree". Even though I might not understand all that professional athletes experience, I cannot fathom the idea that they would experience the same hardships that veterans of several years face.
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SGT Chris Hill - Our experiences are likely closely aligned, but it always isn't just about hardships faced. It is about experiences and going from complete ends of the spectrum almost immediately. Like, when someone leaves prison, or the peace corps, or something that takes you and places you in a situation that you are unlikely to face again.

Also, define normal life? For you it seems, normal life is about having money and money is the tool to create a "normal life". For someone who has experienced something, it could be something as simple as having your kids around all the time, or relaxing on the couch, or having to go grocery shopping like that scene from "Hurt Locker".

It isn't necessarily about combat. It is about being a part of a system that chews you up and spits you out and says, "thanks. welcome to the rest of your life." Mental challenges can't be bribed to go away, no matter how much money you have.
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SFC Instructor
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I could see the correlation in both perspectives. SGT Chris Hill, your article now has me thinking about transition 8 years from now, because the Army is all that I've known, having came straight out of high school.
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SGT Chris Hill
SGT Chris Hill
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SFC (Join to see) it's a major transition for me as well, I've done 10 years and it's obviously been all I've known for so long now. More than ready though!
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SGT(P) Supply Sergeant (S4)
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SGT (Join to see) I guess everybody will follow the line that they are full of money and we are not but, the comparison doesn't mention finances at all. I think we should read objectively and see if there's a true comparative, I think there is. But for those that will think just in the athletes money, do a quick search on bankruptcy in retirees pro-athletes and you may find some interesting numbers. Back to the point, I think the article goes to the point of the lifestyle change and I didn't see it as an "insult" but a fair comparison.
Just my .02 cents.
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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Thanks "Hot Rod" SGT(P) (Join to see), for you're great response. It's hard to look at it as "pro" football, or pro, any other sport where they can retire with a lot of money, if they don't goof it off. I would expect to see some bankruptcy from a lot of them. The reason being, they are used to all that money and fame and can't get away from it until they are broke, and hit rock bottom. Where as the vet doesn't have that luxury. They come out broke or near broke unless they can afford to save some of their money, of which, isn't much in today's economy, and that's a shame.
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SGT(P) Supply Sergeant (S4)
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SGT (Join to see) but that's where we fail in the reading, because it doesn't mention it. Everybody pointing the fact that they are millionaires and not reading the part that they mentioned "Team Work", "Camaraderie", "Team Atmosphere" and that is indeed part of our military culture. Some people think that PTS is exclusive for military personnel or deployments, well we have a SSG getting med board with PTS because he lost his house in a fire. He has never deployed, just saying.
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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SGT(P) (Join to see), I hear you. The article is about both losing all those things you mentioned, but I'm sure they get over it quicker than a military member. They still have the money, where regular military members won't.
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SGT(P) Supply Sergeant (S4)
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SGT (Join to see) I really think is a lifestyle issue more than money, if you are millionaire but live a fairly comfortable style, you won't have that many problems once you retire. But in my short career I've seen SFC with 3-4 cars, 2 houses, whenever they get out, BAH and BAS gone, it will be harder for him to adapt. Is all about be money wise. I'm making E4 in January and I already set an alarm to rise my TSP to 10%, it is at 8% now, so when my first paycheck comes I don't get to see the extra money and it won't heart my pocket. My wife always tells me, you make your budget around your savings, not all the way around. You see people getting new cars, new tvs, new stuff and saving what they got left instead of doing it all the way around.
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SSG Audwin Scott
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Really we having this comparison?
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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SSG Audwin Scott, That's what the article was about. That's all I know. Lol
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