Posted on Aug 1, 2016
James Murray
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PatientsLikeMe members said in a survey with our partners at One Mind that they most commonly treat their PTSD with anti-depressants or anti-anxiety medication, and cognitive behavioral therapy. To see what others living with PTSD are saying on PatientsLikeMe, join today at http://www.patientslikeme.com/join/rallypoint (it’s free)!
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Responses: 17
COL Mikel J. Burroughs
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Edited >1 y ago
James Murray Thanks for sharing your website - hope to get the word out to more on RP.

RP Members please get this information out to your contacts:




PFC (Join to see)PVT (Join to see) SSG Shavonde Chase SSG Angela Harris SPC Michael Rodriguez-Holquin LTC Joe Likar
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LTC Joe Likar
LTC Joe Likar
>1 y
I personally did not want to seek help. One day, I went to the VA for a med Appointment and the phycologist was next door to the Dr. office. I was having problems remembering specific incidents and names of fellow soldiers in my unit specifically my RTO's name/ So I went to speak to her and found I have repressed the entire tour. I did not want and did not get any meds to cloud my mind. I found Daily Staff Journals from my year and now read them to remember. It seems to be working to a point. I really need to attend a unit reunion to get some closure.
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COL Mikel J. Burroughs
COL Mikel J. Burroughs
>1 y
COL Scott Pacello - Thanks for the great information and link Scott!
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COL Mikel J. Burroughs
COL Mikel J. Burroughs
>1 y
PFC Jacque Swann - I'd like for you to check out Sponsor a Vet Life (SAVL) as well Jacque. Please reach me via email at: [login to see] Thanks
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SPC Tony Means
SPC Tony Means
>1 y
http://pointmankansas.org/ anyone in the Topeka Kansas area this man is a Vietnam vet who runs a faith based program.
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Cpl Jeff N.
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6
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Stop treating it as a disorder. That simple act may cause you to think differently. Most people learn and grow through challenging traumatic situations. It is possible to have trauma and grow, not just be disordered.
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
SGT (Join to see)
6 y
Cpl Jeff N., It sneaks in once in a while, but I'm not using it as an excuse like I used to do. Sometimes you just get mad. It has nothing to do with PTSD.
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SSG(P) D. Wright Downs
SSG(P) D. Wright Downs
>1 y
The sooner one is treated for PTSD, the sooner one can begin to heal has been proven. There are many who were denied that anythng was wrong with them---like the Gulf War vets where the British have realized their Soldiers are ill but the Americans with the same symptions are not ill accordin gto the VA---and they were ill for 20+ years. We are the ones who will have the problem for the rest of our lives, and some will not get better and some will get worse.
I admit to not having a medical degree. I do know what has been told to me by medical people discussing the latest discoveries of PTSD. I accept that I have lost some of my brain.
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Cpl Jeff N.
Cpl Jeff N.
>1 y
If 20 years of time has not healed any issues you have related to PTSD then there may be no "cure". Time and general well being are about all that can make it better. I know these days we like to talk about puppies and ponies and long walks in the woods, all of which are good for any reason but time and life balance are the only remedies. Drugs and therapy, in my humble opinion, will not do the trick.
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SFC Richard Giles
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5
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I take Bupropion 2 times/day and have a really good social worker who is former military and doesn't sugar count a lot of things and actually understands what I'm talking about vs. some of these "counselors" who think they know what they are talking about because they went to a 2 or 3 week class to understand PTSD.
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SFC Richard Giles
SFC Richard Giles
6 y
Lt Col (Join to see) - What really pissed me off the most was when we came back from Iraq in 2010, within a cpl of weeks if that we had those "counselors" asking us how we felt. Hell I was still trying to unwind and catch my breath, so my response was "I'm tired, I really don't want to be here, can I go know". Ask me those questions later after I've had time to decompress and stop my head from spinning.
I don't know part of me thinks they mean well but then you get the one you got and they want to know why were so uptight.
Seriously all I had on my mind after we got back was making sure my Soldiers were GTG and making sure my paperwork was correct so I could take leave after we got back.
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Lt Col Commander
Lt Col (Join to see)
6 y
I hear you - same happened to me after all three middle east deployments (last was 13 months in Afghanistan)... but in contrast to my return (instant attention), when my father returned there was zero spin-down... they released him from the AOR to the civilian wold literally immediately off the plane... no decompression. In fact, he still had his 1911 .45 on his belt when he returned on mil-air... and he was stopped by a sheriff for driving 30mph on the freeway (for over a year, he never drove his jeep faster than that... he felt like he was going plenty fast)... I'm no medical professional, but there has to be a balance between zero decompression and instant forced decompression upon return.
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Sierra C.
Sierra C.
6 y
SFC Richard Giles - There are other therapy methods that are less 'invasive' to the extent that they are based around relaxation and connecting with nature, such as Morita Therapy. I prefer these techniques because instead of an impersonal "counselor" digging in to you for answers, it allows you to gather your thoughts and work it out in your own mind, after which you can express yourself through art, gardening or whatever healthy means you can personally discover to sooth what ales you.
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SFC Richard Giles
SFC Richard Giles
6 y
Sierra C. - I'll look into that. Thank You.
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