Posted on Oct 13, 2017
SFC Small Group Leader
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Maj John Bell
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Edited 3 mo ago
Out of uniform and off-base, nothing identifying him or her as a service member; I'd let it pass.

In uniform or actively signaling that he/she is a service member, I'd identify myself and ask to see their ID. Then I would ask their unit, the unit's phone number, and the unit's senior SNCO. Finally I would tell them that I would be referring the matter to their senior SNCO, and advise them that they probably want to make sure that SNCO knows before 0800 on the next work day. Because I will by 0815. And God help them if they've lied about what unit they belong to because I will track them down.
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PO1 Kevin Dougherty
PO1 Kevin Dougherty
3 h
LCpl Robert Choiniere - Nope, it is not, it is ceremonial.

Gold fringe is used on the National flag as an honorable enrichment only. It is not regarded as an integral part of the flag and its use does not constitute an unauthorized addition to the design prescribed by statutes.

Records of the Department of the Army indicate that fringe was used on the National flag as early as 1835 and its official use by the Army dates from 1895. There is no record of an Act of Congress or Executive Order which either prescribes or prohibits the addition of fringe, nor is there any indication that any symbolism was ever associated with it. The use of fringe is optional with the person or organization displaying the flag.

A 1925 Attorney General’s Opinion (34 Op. Atty. Gen 483) states:

“The fringe does not appear to be regarded as an integral part of the flag, and its presence cannot be said to constitute an unauthorized additional to the design prescribed by statute. An external fringe is to be distinguished from letters, words, or emblematic designs printed or superimposed upon the body of the flag itself. Under the law, such additions might be open to objection as unauthorized; but the same is not necessarily true of the fringe.”

It is customary to place gold fringe on silken (rayon-silk-nylon) National flags that are carried in parades, used in official ceremonies, and displayed in offices, merely to enhance the beauty of the flag. The use of fringe is not restricted to the Federal Government. Such flags are used and displayed by our Armed Forces, veterans, civic and civilian organizations, and private individuals. However, it is the custom not to use fringe on flags displayed from stationary flagpoles and, traditionally, fringe has not been used on internment flags.
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Cpl Ulises Vasquez
Cpl Ulises Vasquez
2 h
SGT Quanda Brown - Bottom line is you are not allowed to protest in uniform. The main reason is because the media, if the catch wind, will blow it up. Next thing you know you will see "The Army" agrees with such and such ideals. As a professional warfighter and model citizen in service to the US you must be professional and smart about the decisions you take.

You should never allow your opinions or ideals to be mistaken for those of the organization. Its just not professional.
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Maj Owner
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2 h
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Absolutely not, I'd arrest him and sort it out at the brig
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Maj Owner
Maj (Join to see)
2 h
Maj John Bell
John, I learned when I was a platoon leader, you can't be friends with your men. My first jobwas to take care of them, and not let them run in
town like a stray. I'd square them away fast, or have some stripes. My men intown will look and behave like Marines
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SMSgt Operations Superintendent
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Depends on the circumstances.

Off duty and out of uniform, we would have a quiet conversation.

On duty and/or in uniform, he would have a really bad day.
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Sgt John de Nugent
Sgt John de Nugent
1 mo
Anyone so alienated from this country should not be in the military. I doubt he would really defend it with his life when the bullets start flying. He might even go over to the enemy.
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SFC Leon Amer
SFC Leon Amer
1 mo
Sgt John de Nugent - I would do everything I had to do to avoid having that knucklehead dirtbag in my unit if we had to deploy - he'd be prime suspect #1 if somebody's hootch had a grenade roll under it in the wee hours without the pin.
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PO1 David Shepardson
PO1 David Shepardson
29 d
SFC Leon Amer - You always need point.
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SFC Leon Amer
SFC Leon Amer
29 d
PO1 David Shepardson - "Point"? As in, the lead person of a patrol? I was a 13C/D, battalion and higher FDC for Field Artillery, so patrols weren't part of my skill set ... but thanks for the comment anyway.
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COL William Oseles
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If a soldier kneels during the National Anthem he or she can be Courts Martialed.
Free Speech in the military is constrained by the UCMJ.

DOD Directive 1344.10 - POLITICAL ACTIVITIES BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES ON ACTIVE DUTY, extend these same requirements to all individuals on active duty.
Active duty enlisted members and warrant officers who violate these provisions can be charged under Article 92 of the UCMJ, Failure to Obey an Order or Regulation.
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LCpl Michael Cappello
LCpl Michael Cappello
20 d
God Bless you sir. Out daggone standing.
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SGT Quanda Brown
SGT Quanda Brown
13 h
They need to court martial those people who raped Pvt Johnson overseas. They raped her, cut out her vagina, and did other gruelsome things. The chain of command was allowed to walk.... But we talking about court martial someone for kneeling. Until it happens to your family or close friend maybe you understand. Taking a knee is not disrespecting our country but standing up for the cover ups (murders rapes, molestations, duis,...the list is too long.) is doing that disrespecting our flag. One under God with liberty and justice for all!!!!!
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SGT Quanda Brown
SGT Quanda Brown
13 h
COL William Oseles protesting peacefully is part of our rights
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LTC Scott Higgins
LTC Scott Higgins
3 h
SGT Quanda Brown In these times you don’ really get to pick what some gestures or symbols means. For example, some people might have a confederate flag but say it just means they are proud of being a southerner, but many more people feel the confederate flag is an offensive symbol. Some people say that kneeling during the Anthem isn’t intended to be disrespectful to the military or the country but many people are very offended by the act. Who gets to decide what is offensive or not? It’s clear that the Military is trying hard to restrict service members from displaying symbols or gestures that are perceived by many to be offensive.
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