Posted on Mar 8, 2017
SCPO Weapons Department Enlisted Advisor
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A handful of countries have or have had a policy similar to this (all males), I want to know how you think it would affect the United States and whether it should be all males or all persons.
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MSgt Neil Greenfield
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I would say it would be a good thing for the country IF, and only IF, there were no deferments allowed, except for people with disabilities, all 7 uniformed services took in personnel, not just the Army, and there were possible alternatives (such as serving in the Peace Corps, Reserves, National Guard, Americorps, etc.).
Too many of the privileged never serve, in fact, I think it's less than 2% of the population now that has ever served. There are too many people in this country that don't have a clue what civic duty means, they're into doing what's best for themselves, not helping their fellow citizens, etc. Politicians should be required to serve before beginning elected office, and I could go on and on. And I would make it equally apply to women as well.
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MSgt Elaine Bowman
MSgt Elaine Bowman
3 mo
The only issue would be the amount of time and money it takes to train someone. Basic training is approximately 8 weeks; some tech schools are months long. Then you have to train the person to a certain level before they can do the tasks assigned without supervision. So, once you get them to that point, it's time for them to leave. Would it benefit society? It might. Would it be worth the time and money is the bigger question.
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COL Ralph Bryan Hanes
COL Ralph Bryan Hanes
2 mo
Your comments are spot on...but they also support universal service as well. It allows us to surge TRAINED personnel on short notice vs having to recruit, train, and integrate vs just mobilize and integrate. BIG advantage!
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SSG Russell DeWade
SSG Russell DeWade
2 mo
Easy to pay for. CUT ALL FOREIGN AID!
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SSG Raul Alaniz
SSG Raul Alaniz
28 d
I’ve ALWAYS believed politicians should serve our country, but be that as it may, it’s not always the case. I’ve met people in my lifetime that have never served, but I keep my opinions to myself and move on. Nowadays Selective Service is is required if nothing else.
THE SARGE
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LTC Trent Klug
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Were this to come to pass, I see it as affecting our readiness negatively.
1) A vast majority of service age males couldn't pass the physical standards as it stands now. Its bad enough that the Army allows soldiers to graduate from Basic Training without ever meeting the minimum scores for the APFT. Soldiers only have to score 50 points per event and they will go on to AIT.
2) Economically, the US could not afford to have everyone serve. At some point, I could see Congress cutting pay in order to pay the salaries of all of those on active duty. Or they would raise taxes in order to pay for the additional manpower.
3) The turnover of soldiers would leave a vast majority of the services in a constant state of flux. In the mid to late 80's, the Army Cohort system brought in a battalion's worth of new soldiers who were together from day one. From personal experience, my platoon suffered an almost 67% attrition rate for the three year life cycle of the cohort we received in April 1989. Of the 23 soldiers we received that month, only 7 were still with the platoon on their contracted ETS date. I don't see mandatory service being any different.
4) Congress will still ensure there will be deferrals and you can bet their kids won't ever serve. They'll get out of service some way, some how.
Lastly, this, just like the talk of bringing back the draft is just designed to destroy our military readiness as you don't fix something that ain't broke. But that's just my jaded opinion.
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SSG Richard Bladl
SSG Richard Bladl
5 mo
SGT Walter Drumm - Disgree, when we had the draft many draftees continued in service and even retiring. We need some sort of draft because today's minimum requirements to enlist are way over board and ridicules in many cases. i spent 8+ yrs active and saw many that continued their service beyond the 2 yr active commitment.
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CPT Special Forces Officer
CPT (Join to see)
4 mo
Sir,
I understand your position and your concerns. The draft (at least in WWII) brought about a certain homogeneity to the American male experience. For all non-hackers, they will stay in the military until they are "hackers". Only the best of all inductees would be retained in service (there is always some inducement that can be found). The remainder would be assigned (in no particular order) to the NG, USAR, with something at the bottom like "Armed Forces - Inactive Reserve". It would also be desirable to come up with a way of getting them in for refresher training at least every other year or every four years.
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SPC Joseph Nastasi
SPC Joseph Nastasi
4 mo
agree and also should be 3 years mandatory for illegals and immigrants... also once ets w/ honorable all vets should have option and be allowed to carry firearm in all 50 states and 1st in line to be cops firemen and public office.... no public office without prior service no exceptions
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SSG Russell DeWade
SSG Russell DeWade
2 mo
EASY. Cut ALL Foreign Aid!
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Sgt Field Radio Operator
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I only want people serving that want to serve. This would be a bad idea and would do more harm than good. Our military could not handle that many people each year, and the cost would be enormous.
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SFC James Smith
SFC James Smith
7 mo
Great comment although I believe some form of service is better than paying them to sit at home in their parents house on the govt dime. The entitled attitude of the young people today is frightening
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Bonnie Hester
Bonnie Hester
6 mo
At last, I am so pleased to see this discussion! Bring back the Draft and have men & women serve in the range of Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, yes, hospitals training to be nurses, diagnostic technicians doctors, firemen, MPs. Since the 60s's that generation has had it so easy and are not patriotic, many don't even bother to vote. They know very little about our countries history or history in general. Many are not loyal to our great USA.
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SP5 Finance Specialist
SP5 (Join to see)
4 mo
I humbly disagree! Whether drafted or volunteered, all would share in the freedom that we have in our great country - U.S. Especially if threatened by another country.
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MSG Dennis Lane
MSG Dennis Lane
2 mo
When I knew I was about to be drafted, I enlisted so that I could have some voice in what I was going to be doing during my required service time. I knew nothing about the military; I was not in great shape; I did what I had to do to survive. In the process, I grew up. I predict that would happen for lots of kids if the draft were reinstated.
My father was a WWII vet, and he knew his son would not be much of a soldier. So he was surprised when I reenlisted. Later, when I got orders for Drill Sergeant School, Dad said I would not be successful. He was wrong, and I loved it so much I extended.
The draft ended while I was a Drill Sergeant; before too long, we integrated women into the Regular Army (women were only authorized to be WACs prior to that point).
So I experienced the draft Army, and I experienced the Volunteer Army (AKA VOLAR back then). The voices in this thread, both positive and negative, ring true. The Draft grows a person up, but it also brings in malcontents who will never grow up. The draft poses leadership challenges, but so does a volunteer force. I think the most positive thing about a mandatory, all-inclusive requirement for some time of universal international service is that it would require people from all walks of life to interact and learn from others, especially with visits to places where things aren't just like where they grew up. They appreciate home better and realize that some things are worth extra effort.
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