Posted on Mar 4, 2014
CPT Lance Cutsforth
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When I left the military, I had my checklist in hand and had to go to various places to get stamps and initials so I could properly 'clear'. One of those stops was the equivalent of an External Employment Office where there were some print outs of job listings and a couple of civilians who taught basic resume writing classes every so often. That was pretty much all I remember. The question is - is that enough? Military life and civilian life are very different. Most civilians cannot relate to the life of a soldier, and soldiers have a hard time 're-entering' civilian life. RallyPoint is a tool in the transition process, so lets use this venue to air some thoughts and ideas. What is in place these days to help soldiers in the transition, and is it enough? I have only touched on career transition in the dialogue here. How about transition from hostile zones back to garrison then to civilian world? We are put in situations that most will never face and then we are trying to assimilate into regular society and workforce. Is there enough being done to help soldiers in that transition?
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CPT Nurse
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Don't shoot the messenger here, but exactly what obligation does the military have to ensure transitioning members find gainful civilian employment? No other employer I've heard of does that. On the Army's part, prior to receiving your DD 214, you must complete ACAPS. I believe the onus is on the individual to take it from there. As we've seen in different posts, there is a wealth of job/career assistance websites for veterans both DOD and civilian. But they must initiate it! My husband has contacted the local VA rep quite a few times looking for veterans. In our state, there are bonuses for veteran friendly employers. He's also a mil spouse and wants to look out for transitioning veterans. Many times, he can't find vets or they are sorely unprepared for the civilian workplace. Many can't function independently and critical thinking skills are lacking. I'm generalizing here, but that has been his experience.
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MSG Brad Sand
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Short answer is 'BNo' but you need define adequately? I think a lot depends upon the mindset of those returning to civilian life. The right mind set...in just about anything...is going to be the real difference maker.
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SFC William Stephens A. Jr., 3 MSM, JSCM
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yes! but the problems very from base to base, Some services I can't speak for, As much I love the ARMY I still struggled with resume and cover Letters when I got out. I do not know how many times I have rewritten my resume but I remember when I was getting ready to leave the service my resume was not that long, and that is the problem. Trying to make the wording from FIELD ARTILLERY to todays modern world. It is true, it can be done, with the help of friends, counterparts, In DOD we call them SES because of the Langue they know, and the supervisors I worked for as well, Field Artillery is in the past. But never forgotten because I have my Artillery button by my desk everyday I look up at because I know what I have been through. I know there are some REDLEGS out there who serviced with me or we went to school together for NCOES. I'm here to help. I've been in the CIV world for about 10 years now and I just learned from websites and a little time away, the correct way a Cover letter should be, and I feel my resume is very good, not the best but still, I got this job and I work for great agency, not company. SO I been on the other side of the tracks and know some who still are there trying to find their way, For transitioning soldiers listening up. that dream job will not fall in your lap. I was Senior Sergeant when I got with 2 years of college and where did I end up working PEPSI. Stocking and doing displays, I was sick of a 27 year old telling my old ass what to do, so I began to draft my resume some more, JOB after crappie job and then I worked for the prison. I had nothing left but I always want to do security and I used my Army background to get that job. Building more of the resume, NETWORKING was the key, So I said "I'm going to start putting all of this together and when I started posting my resume on line, on US JOBS and etc., the KEY came to me. I have to admit looking back at my resume to what I have today I had a crappie resume. I've been in this security position for 6 years and I'm not guard or a uniform person, I work security for an agency and for a FA guy I'm doing well. Right now looking for the dream job I want because I feel there are other security positions I can feel with my level of training. You can do it, You need help I'll help you, it takes time and dedication.
Any one in the services who had a shity job like me can get a good job. 13Z STEPHENS
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