Posted on Jan 11, 2016
SPC Squad Member
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I'm currently in the midst of receiving a conditional release from the reserves into the active component (I know a 368 is a slow process and usually doesn't work out but it seems like I'm one of the lucky ones). I'm a 92R and I meet all of the requirements as stated by the current business rules. My questions are: where do you think I'll start in OSUT (day one, week nine, etc.), how were the MOST guys in your cycle treated, could I call branch and see what assignments are open to me around the time of graduation or will I get orders like all the IET soldiers, what was the infantry like in contrast to your previous MOS for those of you who reclassed, what are some of your biggest likes and dislikes about the infantry? If you feel that there is other pertinent information I should have feel free to include it in your comments. Also if you have any questions for me I'd be more than happy to answer. Thank you for your time.
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CPT Retired
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I've been all around. I was an enlisted Infantry soldier in active duty, then in the NG, reclassified to Engineer then back to Infantry before commissioning as an Armor Officer. I just branch transferred to JAG.
Active duty Infantry is really hard on the body so be fit, stay fit. Learn to accept that being a grunt really requires you to learn to be physically uncomfortable (Embracing the Suck). It's a mind game. Be a professional and know your job. Study the manuals. Be a team player and enjoy the best damn job in the Military. It's all a team effort but in the end, everyone else in the military is there to support the the grunts!
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SGT Dave Tracy
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3 years ago I left Active Duty Infantry for an 88m slot in the Reserves, and it was a bit of a culture shock. I liken it to having changed to a different branch of the military, but still get to wear the same uniform. I suspect you may have a similar experience, but that's not a bad thing. You will probably think--generally speaking--its a positive change.

When I was at Benning (AKA: The Sand Hill School For Wayward Boys) we had a couple reclass guys who came in around week 7ish. The drills had somewhat higher expectations of them, but not unrealistic expectations. Their experience and knowledge were a good asset to us soldiers-in-training.

Be right with PT; especially running. If this is a running Army, then know the Infantry is a running MOS within a running Army! Lastly, even though you are a soldier already, and know a few things, check your ego at the door; don't worry, you will pick up an even bigger one when you graduate with your Blue Cord!
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SGT Squad Leader
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Edited 5 y ago
I'll try to answer your questions briefly and in order.

You'll probably start at the "AIT" portion of OSUT, which if I recall correctly is week 8 or 9. It's been a while.

The one reclass we had in our cycle was treated more leniently than everybody else, which led to a little bit of resentment and respect in equal measure. The Drill Sergeants expect the prior service guys to have their ducks in a row, and the recruits will have a lot of questions about military life for you. You will not fly under the radar as a prior service soldier at OSUT. Eyes will be on you, for better or worse, so be squared away and you'll have an easy time of it.

As for duty station, unless you got it on paper otherwise or snag a slot for Airborne, selection, or whatever, you'll probably go worldwide. Needs of the Army.

I started out active infantry, reclassed to 68W in the NG. Biggest likes about infantry were the brotherhood, doing the cool guy stuff, kicking in doors, and getting all the cool toys. When things go well you get to go home feeling like a bad***. When they go badly you have your brothers to lean on.

Some of my dislikes were being paid the same as people you perceive as having much easier jobs, frequently being uncomfortable, and living/sleeping/working in terrible conditions while people are trying to kill you. Biggest dislike was not learning hard skills that are easy to translate to a potential employer outside of law enforcement and the physical security industry. I would recommend choosing an MOS more directly applicable to the demands of the civilian job market if there's any doubt in your mind about making the military or government work a long-term career.

IMHO. Your mileage may vary. I wish you the best of luck and will do my best to answer any other questions if you have them.
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