Posted on Aug 27, 2020
PV2 Cannon Crew Member
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I joined the National Guard because one: I'm seventeen and wanted to get into the game as early as I could, and two: I wanted to go to "normal" college. I've been trying to find more information on how to transfer to Active after I graduate, and from what I gather it's a lot of paperwork.
Those of you who transferred, what was the transition to "normal" Army life like, getting used to the way things are run, etc.? Also, is there any way to put in a request for a duty station?
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Responses: 6
SGM G3 Sergeant Major
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It's a couple of forms that need a couple of signatures that could take 2 months or 6 months.
In the Guard, your state G1 approves your conditional release for AD.
Or if your ETS date is coming up within 6-9 months after graduation, you can just have the AD recruiter do a prior service contract for the day after your ETS.
You can also just do ROTC while in college, smoke it and qualify for an AD commission...
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SPC William Wilson
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The culture shock is a big one. Going from really relaxed national guard standards to a active duty standards was a eye opener for me.
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SFC Observer   Controller/Trainer (Oc/T)
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One thing I forgot to mention about another difficult part. When you are approved for release to Active Duty, when you go to MEPS, you will be there ALLLLLL DAY. The reason being is that you would be considered Prior Service, so you will be one of the very last folks finalized for processing, contract signing, and swearing in at the end of the day. It's gonna be a long wait. Bring a book (a very thick one) if you can.
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SPC Cannon Crew Member
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It doesn't take long to get relwase from national guard to active duty . It took me 3 weeks to switch , was with 1106th hhd tasmg , now I am in active . The problem most soliders find is the fact they will not have a choice in mos or length in service
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