Posted on Dec 19, 2019
Terrianna Chanel
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I’m going to be doing 92G (culinary specialist/ food service) for the U.S army and wanted to hear some different opinions on the MOS. Especially if you also had or have this MOS i would definitely love to hear what you feel about it.
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Responses: 12
LTC Jason Mackay
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Edited 10 mo ago
You and your team mates have IMMENSE impact on soldier morale, good and bad. Lots of shift work. It really depends on what you want to do. There are competitions (I've led a Connelly Award team, field feeding category, won FORSCOM level) where if you win at Army level you could get a scholarship to Johnson and Wales. Some of the most impressive food and decorating displays I have ever seen, including in house ice sculptures border on the five star professional, especially at a thanks giving. As a more senior 92G, you are managing dining facilities, forecasting supplies, managing menus, creative rearrangement of standard rations to create variety, and making decisions on workload to support multiple missions. I've met good and I've met bad, but the good ones, were the Best. SFC Lloyd, SFC Jim Denett, MSG Ricky Morris are just a few of the greats.
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
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I was a Finance Officer at one point. Support soldiers are underappreciated, but your job will be part of the cog that impacts the morale and sustenance of other soldiers. I have often told my soldiers to put love into the process. You as a food specialist can have a great impact to others. Remember to put love in the process if you become a food specialist.
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SGT Dave Tracy
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Edited 10 mo ago
I give them credit; it's an important, but unsung task. They work crazy hours sometimes, and out in the field, I have to believe it's hotter than hell in their mobile kitchens, but if "an army moves on it's stomach", then it's the cooks you can thank for that.
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SFC Senior Brigade Career Counselor
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Cons: shift work, working in the kitchen all the time (kitchens all look the same), carpal tunnel, smelling like onions

Pros: shift work, advanced culinary opportunities, lots of room for promotion, generals aide, can work at any location and organization, your time in the field is pretty clean and well fed, offers a pathway into logistics

Basically, it's a fairly normal job, and it offers lots of good opportunities if you want to work a bit harder than your peers to stand out. The shift work can make it hard to stay in shape, but the steady schedule can also make it easier to plan for completing college courses.
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