Posted on Dec 31, 2018
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Prior Air Force Master Sergeant (E-7) heading to Army BCT (Ft. Benning) as a Sergeant First Class (E-7) in 3 weeks. What does basic look like as an E-7?
Edited >1 y ago
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Responses: 69
SPC Erich Guenther
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Yeah they should pull you aside and brief you before the training starts.....probably when you report in. I will tell you when I went to Air Assault School, we had a SFC complain publicly in front of the PVT, PFC's........the whole class that as a SFC he wasn't going to pull guard duty on everyones equipment while they breaked for lunch and he found it insulting he was on a work detail with Privates. Eh, my advice is never do that because the NCO Cadre tore him a new azzhole publicly in response. Just be very formal and humble at Ft Benning your first priority is to learn. Asserting rank while in an Army school is always a bad idea unless your told otherwise. Let the other NCO's tell you what is OK and not OK when they brief you prior to training.
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Nikki Manoussos
Nikki Manoussos
1 mo
My son goes to air assault in a a month after green platoon. How hard is it?
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MSG Randy Almendinger
MSG Randy Almendinger
19 d
As a retired Military Academy Instructor I say that a student is ALWAYS subordinate to the Instructor, BUT military courtesies and protocols should also be maintained.
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SSG Mike Busovicki
SSG Mike Busovicki
8 d
Nikki Manoussos - Air Assault (AASLT) is hard both physically and mentally (most Army schools either test you in one aspect OR the other, not both). That said, it's certainly not impossible, and the pass rate is very high. It's just a challenge to most, that's all. First and foremost, make sure a team leader or squad leader (or at least someone who has graduated from AASLT) does a full lay out and inspection of his packing list / gear before going. You have a *very* limited amount of time to correct any deficiencies on zero day (in-processing, PT test, and obstacle course qualification to be accepted into the school), so the less problems the better. *Take new and serviceable gear*. The school is super detail oriented (basic training was nothing compared to the inspections here). As a young trooper, he shouldn't have much trouble with PT (they do ability group runs in formation). He should *definitely* study for the written exams - study with a buddy and quiz each other (closed note tests!). This is an Army school where you *should* ask questions, especially for the hands-on slingload test material. The roadmarch (RM), which is the last test to pass on graduation day, is fairly challenging - 12 miles in less than 3 hours. The key is not to burn yourself out by trying to run too fast at the start. It's also easier to roll an ankle. Most people take off at the start, which is fine (in order to space yourselves out). But after a few hundred meters, I recommend settling into a jog or "Airborne Shuffle" for as much of it as you can, at least for the first couple of miles if you can't do it most of the way. Keep your stopwatch running; 4 miles per hour is the pace to *pass* the test and correct your pace as necessary. Try to stay just inside that pace. If starting to feel too fatigued to continue at your pace, its ok to slow down. Even ok to go to a walk (but only for short bursts to catch yourself up to go again). If the route takes you on a hardball road and you're having a hard time jogging continuously, walk the distance between 2 telephone poles, then jog to the next. Walk to the next, jog to the next. Or 2 telephone pole lengths. No poles or other equally spaced markers? Do it for 30 seconds on and off (jog, then range-walk, repeat). That way you're not lulled into too slow of a pace that you can't make up later. I also recommend trying to do the RM with a buddy - both for motivation and to keep an eye on each other. Paired up, you can take water breaks together (it's easier and also good to see if someone is getting overheated). You also may be authorized a piece of hard candy or something to keep your mouth from drying out later during the event (a good idea; just don't actually get out of control and, like, "eat a meal" during the RM). You'll probably know the people in your class by the time the last day rolls around, so pick a battle buddy in your ability group from the runs (they're more likely to RM the same pace that you do, so you're not waiting on someone or slowing down a faster Soldier. Also, pick someone about the same height as you - your stride length will match, which is important over the course of 12 miles). And hold the rifle you're carrying by one arm at the slipring (where the handguards meet the chamber portion of the upper receiver), letting your arm dangle at full length and loose. Holding it any other way smokes your arms and adds unnecessary fatigue. Switch arms as necessary. All of this (and getting over a fear of heights, if any) is all you need to do. 11 days total and you're done. So if it's tough, at least it's short. Good luck! AIR ASSAULT!
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SSG Mike Busovicki
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1SG Frank Boynton
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I don’t know but Damn you are really going back to basic? God bless you and good luck.
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SGT Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
SGT (Join to see)
4 mo
As an E-7, he should have been more professional about his displeasure. But as a Soldier going thru Basic again, he should know that there are certain tasks that he will be required to do. As an E-5 SGT (R), I know that if I ever go crazy and re-enlist, Please shoot me and know that I will be doing the same things that the lower ranks are doing. Just because I am a NCO does not get me out of training like the other troops. Now if the People in Charge deem that I should be above having to be on a shit-burning detail because I am a NCO, then who am I to disagree? I am sorry but he was the one who raised his Right Arm and took the Oath to follow the orders of those appointed over him, and as Drill Sgts, they were appointed over him. Plain and Simple and to the Point.
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SGT(P) Vincent Kuhlman
SGT(P) Vincent Kuhlman
3 mo
Amn Jennifer Lee (Doerflinger) Hill - The Air force is indeed rank grade Lighter. Your SSG ( staff Sgt) is E-5 while ours is E-6. Years ago the airforce did AWAY with the rank of SGT, for reason unknown, to me. Now you go from SR Airman, to Staff SGT.
I hope this helps.
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1SG Leo Leal
1SG Leo Leal
2 mo
I went to basic at age 34 had a great time. went in as a PFC I already knew a lot of military courtesy and doctrine. The weapons were a breeze I was in a squad leader position for the duration. Never pulled age or wisdom. I remained part of the team and helped when asked by the DS. I was called grandpa but thought of it as honor. No issues ever. great times
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Sgt Robert Shaw
Sgt Robert Shaw
4 d
SGT(P) Vincent Kuhlman - I was in The Air Force ' 71 - ' 75 . I was one of the last Buck Sergeant's E - 4 .
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SPC Elijah J. Henry, MBA
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COL Jon Lopey
COL Jon Lopey
1 y
SPC Henry and All: It goes to show you us "mature Soldiers" have a chance after all. Before I retired I had to work harder to stay in optimum shape but some of us older officers and NCOs did better than the youngsters because we were a little more cunning and we worked a lot harder. Good for him - A true patriot and a fine Soldier & leader. I think many of us would go back and do the same thing if we were needed. COL L
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CW3 Don Malay
CW3 Don Malay
1 y
Roger COL Lopey Sir, when I switched over I was 30 years old. I was amazed that i was in better shape than most 18-19 year old trainees the same went when I entered WOCS at 39.
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SSG Jerry Pannell
SSG Jerry Pannell
4 mo
Gives a new meaning to being a soldier for life I feel the same way.
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WO1 Dave Middleton
WO1 Dave Middleton
2 mo
In 1970 WOC school I was surprised that so many prior NCOs quit because they could not deal with the harassment from the TAC officers. We. Newbies were to dumb to know any thing different. It was like basic on steroids. The couple of Marines who had transferred to the Army to fly, though, laughed at how light the harassment was.
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