Posted on Mar 18, 2015
SSgt Brandon Sisson
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I have worked in staffing most of my civilian life and have always done what I can for my fellow brothers and sisters in arms. It seems that a great deal of OIF/OEF era vets are having trouble finding good careers. Why do you think that is?

My goal is to help as many vets find careers, not just another job.
Posted in these groups: Imgres Employment
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Responses: 5
SFC Contract Administrator
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SSgt Brandon Sisson, for me it was offsetting my disabilities with a career job that was Veteran friendly. Compelling to say the least!
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SSgt Brandon Sisson
SSgt Brandon Sisson
7 y
I think once Veterans learn how to deal with their disabilities it becomes easier to "pair" those with the best career field. I know in Dallas/Fort Worth we are doing everything we can to make sure that companies see the benefit in hiring vets.
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SFC Contract Administrator
SFC (Join to see)
7 y
Thanks for the introspective insight on this topic, it really helps and I am grateful for companies that value Veterans skill sets. I will always advocate the push for Veteran friendly companies. It matters!
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TSgt Joshua Copeland
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SSgt Brandon Sisson Being IT it does make the transition a bit easier, especially when your dealing with much of the same "Stuff" since most .mil networks are running off of COTS software and hardware. One of the challenges some of my peers have had in transitioning was articulating the level of responsibility and oversight they had in their military duties to easy to understand terms.
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SSgt Brandon Sisson
SSgt Brandon Sisson
7 y
I believe one thing that needs to be taught in Transition classes is how to translate your Military exp to civilian lingo.
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CW5 Desk Officer
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That's really kind of you, SSgt Brandon Sisson. I would say that translating military skills into civilian terminology that works for civilian employers is a very big hurdle. That, and networking, but I'm not sure you can help with networking.

I'm sure there are many other people and companies out there who help with the translation of skills (the wording on résumés), but I would say that's at least "a" number one problem among new vets who are transitioning.
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SSgt June Worden
SSgt June Worden
7 y
I agree that composing a resume can be a huge hurdle. Even for those of us who have been separated from service for 25 years. I've been fortunate that most of my employers have been veteran friendly and know the questions to ask during an interview. Best of luck to all those in search of employment!!!
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CSM Michael Lynch
CSM Michael Lynch
7 y
CW5 (Join to see) you are networking right now on here, however LinkedIn is also a good source for networking with folks across the nation. There are a lot of recruiters, talent acquisition and HR folks that will post jobs on there before they hit the street. You should be able to find folks you have served with on linked in also and rebuild that network. Army is a small world and Mos's are just as small. You can also start networking with the Chamber of Commerce on where you are going to retire, not to mention the Kiwanis and Rotaries and Toast Master. You will find a lot of former military in these groups again that you can network with and grow your own.
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