Posted on Aug 4, 2016
CPO Officer Candidate
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Posted in these groups: Imgres DeploymentDuty honor country tadhc 4t Duty
Edited >1 y ago
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CWO2 Richard Rose
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96 hours followed by a couple hours of sleep and back up for 72 more hours. This was on the Wasp in the communications technical control to trouble shoot a serious problem with the automated SSECCS AN/SSC-10 System. Our problem was magnified due to being the battle group flag ship. 24 to 36 hours were not uncommon. 18-20 hours were expected. 48 months of that was ridiculous. Command Climate was the worst that I experienced during my career. I had some of the best young men this country has to offer.
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CPO Officer Candidate
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As an IT myself, I can appreciate that. I'm sure your men were more than willing to sacrifice their liberty and sleep to ensure systems were back up and running. However, troubleshooting effectiveness goes out the door after that 12 hour mark. By 24 hours the mind is dull enough that tasks like driving become hazardous. I cannot imagine what your men, and yourself, must have been feeling after being awake for that long. Moral must have been low and the men must have been zombies. It takes nearly a week of good sleep (good luck finding that out to sea) after missing that many sleep cycles. I've seen what being awake for 5 days does to a man when guys go through Hell Week. I appreciate your service and leadership, Sir!
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CPT Jack Durish
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72 hours. The 9th Infantry Division had deployed to Vietnam as a unit and infused with other units in Vietnam (traded personnel) so that the entire division wouldn't all leave at once. Despite their best efforts, about 5,000 men remained with DEROS dates within a two or three week period. I was assigned the special task of identifying them, preparing orders for their return to CONUS, arranging transportation, requesting replacements, etc. The first three days were the hardest. We didn't have accurate lists of them so I had a team of personnel clerks check every 201 file (about 17,000+) to identify them. After the first pass, I did a spot inspection and when I found one they missed, had them repeat the process. It took about three sweeps before I felt confident that we had them all. While they were working on this I coordinated with USARV HQ arranging for replacements and DA requesting orders for next assignments. (DA suggested that we just cut most of them orders to return to Oakland Army Terminal where they would be relayed or given early outs) I also had to coordinate with MAC for transportation. I didn't get to bed until I had every ball in the air. It took a good bit of alcohol to settle down my nerves so that I could get to sleep.
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SGM Mikel Dawson
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36hrs. I'd been on duty at Camp Virginia and the soldier who was scheduled to pull guard duty was needed as a driver for the next, so I pulled his guard duty shift. When the SOG called V Corps Rear for their guard, I answered up. She looked at me and said, "No SGM, I need your guard's name". I looked at her and ask, "Is there a problem with me pulling guard duty?" She didn't know what to say. Ended up I was out on the main gate with a dedicated Infantry squad. When I got there the SQD leader looked at me and said, I could go to the guard shack. I looked at him and ask, "If I was Private Daffy F&ck wad, where would I be?" He said I'd be out on the front gate inspecting incoming vehicles. I told him that's where I needed to be and treat me as a soldier, not a SGM. When the guys learned I was 11B and knew my job, they loosened up and I had a great shift-just one of the guys.
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SFC Combat Engineer
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The few stolen moments are usually the best. :)
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