Posted on Jan 15, 2016
Chris Grimm
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**UPDATE AS OF 12MAY2016**

**I'm happy to announce I've lost a decent amount of weight thus far, and my fitness levels have definitely done up. I still have a ways to go, but I am getting better. I dicked around for a bit too long in starting, but then finally got into gear. My weight has gone from 6'3" and 277 lbs to 255 lbs over the course of two months. I'm looking to continue this journey and drop to approximately 205 lbs which is within the standards of DoD, as well as being a healthy weight for me.

The workout I have been doing has been as follows:

Morning: Elliptical machine (don't use arms, only legs). Use for 30 minutes in a series of sprint intervals. EG one minute all out, one minute rest. I usually go a distance of roughly 3.15 miles while doing this.

After I finish work/class I then hit the gym. At the gym I do a circuit. Circuit is 10 pull ups, 10 push ups, 20 squats, 10 dips. 30 second rest. Repeat five times. This is then followed by another round of cardio.**


I'm a civilian who is interested in enlisting. My biggest issue now is my physical fitness - eg I'm overweight and out of shape. I'm able to plod through a mile, but I know that is substandard.

Can anyone recommend where to start, ways to improve my overall fitness, and a standard I should aim for before enlisting?

Thank you everyone!
Posted in these groups: Logo_no_word_s Fitness
Edited >1 y ago
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Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS
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It really depends on what service you are looking to go into, and what time line you are looking for.

Each service has different Physical Fitness requirements, however they are generally a Run, Upper Body (Push-ups or Pull-ups), and Core (Sit-ups or Crunches).

I would suggest focusing on getting within DoD weight standards FIRST. The reason being is that will make Physical Training SIGNIFICANTLY easier. The easiest way to reduce weight is through DIET. Exercise has LOTS of great benefits, but weight loss is a "secondary" benefit. DIET is how you will lose weight.

While working on weight loss, you can still work on PT though. I would suggest a Couch to 5K (3.1 miles) program. No service has longer than 3 miles requirement, therefore if you train to that standard you will be fine. Your long term goal is to be able to run 3 miles in under 18 minutes (that is a "perfect" score on the Marine Run.)

Additionally, you can work on Push-ups, Pull-ups, and Crunches/Sit-ups simultaneously. Look up the charts for the services (and your age bracket) and aim for 20% above the max. When starting, don't worry about time. Just focus on form, and doing them correctly. Alternate days (Core one day, Upper body the other).

This will get you started.
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CSM Charles Hayden
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Edited 5 y ago
Chris Grimm One vow! Do not drink anything but water and coffee! Eat well, you know that already, DO IT!

As you develop a training program; pay yourself! Not by eating more - by putting your results on a chart that will enable you to compare last week to this week. Then PRAISE yourself! Not daily comparisons, you would be chasing your tail!
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Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS
Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS
5 y
No sugar in the coffee!
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CSM Charles Hayden
CSM Charles Hayden
5 y
Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS He is not going to MCRD San Diego or PI!
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Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS
Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS
5 y
CSM Charles Hayden - I'm referring to the "now." If you want to lose weight, one of the best ways is to reduce "empty calories" which is sugar based drinks. Coffee is a great drink, however if you put 3 sugars in it, and drink 2 pots a day, you lose all benefits of swapping from soda.

As for MCRD, milk & "bug juice" was a lot more common when I went through. There was coffee, but I never had any, and I don't know what would have happened if a recruit grabbed any, and I never saw one try.
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SFC Retention and Transition NCO (USAR)
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Start light so not to injure yourself, sit-ups every day, push-ups every other day and a light run everyday, slowly add more time and speed to each event unit you muscles think it is second nature. Don't start out trying to pass, just do what you body can do, then slowly challenge it.
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