Posted on Apr 25, 2017
SGT Charles Napierala
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I saw this post on reddit and I know there are a ton of military traditions and leaders that suffer from this syndrome. What situations have you found yourself in based off of the "that's the way it's always been done" mentality?
Posted in these groups: Tradition-crest Tradition1024px-smiley.svg HumorLeadership-abstract-007 Leadership
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Responses: 19
CPT Training Officer / Assistant S3
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The first thing that comes to mind is the Military Driver's Licensing Process.

I'm licensed to drive an M1 Abrams main battle tank, 3 different variants of MRAPs, the LMTV platform, and a number of other vehicles. Despite this I apparently am still not qualified to drive the CUCV pickup. Really? It's a GM 1 ton pickup.
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SSG Edward Joy
SSG Edward Joy
>1 y
All you have to do is road test on the largest vehicle that you have to operate, and just familiarize with every thing under that.
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SGT Squad Leader
SGT (Join to see)
>1 y
As a master driver in my unit I'm completely agree with you Sir, not only that but the amount of paper and time reqiured to license one soldier on one model of vehicle. Its a complete headache. Especially since previous Master drivers didn't keep records and now I'm having to fix an entire company's paperwork and retrain them all
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CPT Training Officer / Assistant S3
CPT (Join to see)
>1 y
That seems to be the underlying cause SGT (Join to see) for a lot of the frustration with driver's licenses. I know guys who have taken initial drivers training two and three times over lost paperwork.

A TTP that has worked well for me is Iperm'ing the DA 348. Even when the clerks lose my paperwork I can pull it out of Iperms and I'm good.
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Lt Col Jim Coe
Lt Col Jim Coe
>1 y
AF was a little better when I was on active duty. If you held a valid state drivers license, you could drive most anything (non-tactical vehicles) that was street legal. You needed a special military license to drive a bus or tactical vehicles.
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SFC Career Counselor
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Platoon (or company) led PT. It's a complete waste of time, no one gets anything out of it, and it's painful to watch.
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MSG Tom Earley
MSG Tom Earley
>1 y
I remember it having different results from unit to unit. In 3/4 Cavalry, 25th ID back from 1996-1999 we had a great Troop PT program that focused not just on what was in the FM 21-20, but our unit mission as a Light Cavalry Troop. Some other units I was in it was squared away, but I do remember a couple of units when I was a young soldier where PT was the dirty dozen and done. Bottom line if a units PT program sucks that is the fault of the NCOs since PT is NCO business unless that has changed since I retired.
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SFC Career Counselor
SFC (Join to see)
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MSG Tom Earley - I agree. PT is NCO business. When it's small unit PT, the Senior NCOs should be out doing PT with the squads.
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MSG Tom Earley
MSG Tom Earley
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SFC (Join to see) - That is how we did it, but the Squad Leaders had to submit their PT plan in advance so it could be approved by the Senior NCOs.
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PFC Bradley Campbell
PFC Bradley Campbell
>1 y
based on the millions of dollars the military wastes, their is ample room for improvement. on and off base weight room access for those who pass PT test and for those who dont, they get some structure and assistance from NCO and professional trainers.
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SSgt Gary Andrews
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I've been out for too long to know what processes or training fall into that category today. I will offer this though: Sometimes things continue to be done the way they always have been, because they have a long record of success. I would put a lot of the training in that category. Administrative processes may be different.
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