Posted on Jul 9, 2015
CH (MAJ) William Beaver
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Native Americans culture is still all around us - even if you look at how we adopted it. Roads, parks, schools, teams, rivers, towns, cities, states, etc. So many have Native American names. Every November in the Army, we celebrate National Native American Heritage Month. What important lessons can we learn from the Native Americans? What can they teach us? What would you say is the most important lesson we can learn from this rich culture?
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Responses: 16
Capt Seid Waddell
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Edited 7 y ago
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"Tell General Howard I know his heart. What he told me before, I have it in my heart. I am tired of fighting. Our Chiefs are killed; Looking Glass is dead, Ta Hool Hool Shute is dead. The old men are all dead. It is the young men who say yes or no. He who led on the young men is dead.

It is cold, and we have no blankets; the little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are - perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children, and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead.

Hear me, my Chiefs! I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever."

Chief Joseph - Thunder Traveling to the Loftier Mountain Heights - 1877


http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/joseph.htm
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CSM Charles Hayden
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COL Mikel J. Burroughs
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CH (MAJ) William Beaver I hope you don't mind me sharing my story with the group in relationship to your post? My Great Grandmother was full-blooded Indian out of LaSalle, Illinois (Kaskaskia Indians - kāskāskahamwa) which stands for ‘ he scrapes it off by means of a tool. See spoke perfect French and had many lessons that we had to follow when we ere very young (not to waste water). I remember getting ready to take a bath when I was about 9 years old and I had about an inch of water on the tub and she said that was enough - don't waste water. She passed away like most Indians do in a very unusual way. She lived with my Grandma in her later years at age 99. One day she cut off all of her hair and placed it on her bed, along with two wedding rings (from her two former marriages, that she outlived), along with a couple of other prize possessions. She walked out of the house while my Grandmother was cooking dinner (not facing her) and she asked Grandma (LaSalle) where she was going. She replied, "Just to sit out in the swing." She passed that day in the swing with all her prized possessions and her long Indian hair ready to be buried with her on here journey to the next life. I'll never forget that. My Grandmother who is half Indian lived until she was 99 as well. We buried her with her prized possessions. My Mother is now 80 and going very strong. I hope to do the same for her. I hope I have a little of that Indian blood in me as well. Good post Chaplain CH (MAJ) William Beaver
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SSG Joseph Leckie
SSG Joseph Leckie
7 y
Thank you for your story. I can relate to what you are saying, my father was 100% Apache and he passed away at 103. I just hope being 50% that I can live as long as he did so I can see all the many changes to come in this great world of ours.
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PO2 Mark Saffell
PO2 Mark Saffell
7 y
Hmmm Maybe we shouldnt trust the government. Im sure you could find that answer  among them often
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CH (MAJ) William Beaver
CH (MAJ) William Beaver
6 y
Thank you for this wonderful response!
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SFC Observer   Controller/Trainer (Oc/T)
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Never waste a thing. Family and community is everything. Respect the land. Never take more than you need.
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