Posted on Jan 30, 2016
SSG(P) Customer Service Coordinator
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I was recently transferred into a new unit in my BN and put in a 35F slot. I am shifting from Electronic Warfare. I'm just curious what I should expect not only with the MOS, but with the school and the course content for when I have to go to MOSQ.

Are there any advantages or disadvantages in the different school houses? Is there anything I should be ready for as an E6 going into an MOSQ?
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SSG(P) Intelligence Sergeant
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SSG Newton,

There are SO many things to say and many of them are highlighted in this thread. I always tell my soldiers that to be successful as a Intelligence Analysts they mus be proficient at three basic tasks:

1) Read
2) Write
3) Brief

These skills build on each other and are critical to your ability to perform at a high level.

Reading constantly allows you to do two things: improve your comprehension and help you with vocabulary and word usage. This is incredibly important as the primary reason our skill set exists is to effectively communicate data to the commander and our ability to do so may literally be the difference between life and death to a soldier /operator.

"Read, read, read. Read everything--trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You'll absorb it. Then write. If it is good, you'll find out. If it's not, throw it out the window."
-- William Faulkner


Writing is the primary means an intelligence professional communicates within the community. Without having the ability to clearly and concisely describe the environment we are looking at, we force others to work much harder when preparing for a mission.

"We can exercise our most sophisticated intelligence collection systems, gather rooms full of data, and analyze those data until we reach sound conclusions; but unless we effectively communicate the results of our research, we've wasted our time"
-- James S. Major

And finally the art of Briefing. This is the money maker. This is how we gain the confidence of our commanders. If we are poor at this skill set we will find ourselves being set aside and disregarded. Your ability to brief is tied directly to the other two skills I mentioned above. By having a robust vocabulary and being able to form clear and concise assessments briefing becomes a more natural function. Many people find them selves using filler words such as "um" or "uh" as they search for the right word for the situation or are reaching for a word outside of their comfortable speech patterns. Key to being a good briefer is using only words you are comfortable with and do not try to elevate your vocabulary for the moment.

You will pick up the technical points of the job as you go along through long nights of mission analysis and living as a staff NCO. FM 5-0 is your technical bible for understanding your role, and JP 3-0 for understanding targeting. But if you can do the three things I mentioned earlier, you WILL be successful.
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SPC Intelligence Analyst
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Buy a battle staff smart book. It will be your best friend.
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SSG(P) Counter Terrorism Analyst
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SSG Newton,

Enjoy Riley Barracks. It's where you'll be staying for 17 weeks.

Go to ALC as soon as possible. It is VERY technical and will get you squared away on your 20 and 30 level tasks. I've seen many reclassified Soldiers refuse to attend 35F ALC because "it's a leadership course, just like any other ALC," and that is not correct. The 10 level course is only enough to get your feet wet and head in the right place, but it won't prepare you for the level of knowledge and experience required from 30 level analyst.

Read ADRP 1-02, ADP 2-0, ADRP 2-0, ATP 2-01.3 and ATP 2-33.4.

Your AIT Platoon Sergeant will typically be a senior E6 or an E7. They will be individually responsible for 100-150 IET Soldiers. They will require your assistance, but you will be very limited in how you identify and correct deficiencies.

Use the study hall when it is afforded to you. Pay close attention to detail as 1LT (Join to see) has stated. Use Skillport to take classes on Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and Excel if you are not already very proficient.

And keep an open mind. I'm not sure about your background, but the MI community is much different than most other places in the Army. We need critical thinkers who can argue their point (with respect), and who are not going to agree with what is given to them. You have the advantage of real life experience and there will be a LOT of brand new Soldiers who will look to you for guidance and leadership. You will probably be the first NCO they'll have an actual conversation with and get to know. They will look at you and your experience through a microscope. They will take in everything you give them like a sponge and hope for guidance and counseling along the way. AIT Platoon Sergeants have a lot of work to do and a lot of Soldiers to counsel, but you will have a more direct impact on their view of NCOs.

I hope that helps. Have fun at the school house and if your instructor is SSG Martensen, tell him I said hi.

V/R
SGT Mullet
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SSG(P) Customer Service Coordinator
SSG(P) (Join to see)
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SGT Mullet,

Thanks for the heads up. I've already completed ALC in my previous MOS, but will be lookin for any and every opportunity to digest as much info as I can.

I'll definitely get deep in the ADP, ATP and ADRP's you mentioned. Getting a heads up only sets me up for success!

From what I have been told by my senior leadership already and having come from the S3, this should be a relatively easy transition for me, but that doesn't mean I'll slack off. I'm very driven!!

If I end up with or around IET/AIT soldiers I'll definitely use that to their advantage. I enjoy mentoring young soldiers and teaching them what I have learned in my time.

I'm sure I'll get more of an idea what to expect as I get closer to making the trip to wherever I end up going for school, but I'm definitely looking forward to the change of pace and learning a new skill that I can use for a long time!

Thanks for the info!
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