Posted on May 17, 2016
Cpl Justin Sowell
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SGT(P) Squad Member
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Simply put, entitlement. I saw it everyday when I worked in a recruiters office specifically for Veterans. I see it everytime someone gets out. Most expect someone to give them a job because they served and "deserve" it. There are definitely free great resources and many companies looking to hire veterans and some will even do the leg work for you, but they still have to put in the same dedication and work to get those jobs as they did in the service. Being a Veteran, gives them more opportunity, exposure and full looks at their resumes and I fully support that; however, I don't support the entitlement attitude of "gimme".
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Cpl Justin Sowell
Cpl Justin Sowell
6 y
Yes sir you are right on the money!
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SGT(P) Squad Member
SGT(P) (Join to see)
6 y
Honestly, our generational issues have been cyclical for a while.

You can see the same sense in Elliot Hubbard's 1899 essay "A message to Garcia" where the same sentiments are apparent but not as blatant. Everyone is looking to blame the generational gap, but it is "us" who taught them this. Not us individually but collectively, and more than likely not directly but indirectly through what we teach from questionable orders not being questioned, or don't think for yourself but just take orders. The same generation that stayed at 1 job for their entire lives and pensioned out made considerably less money took a lot more crap than they should've throughout their life and complained here and there, or wasn't very happy the entire time.

I just believe that the new generation gets a bad rap, when it was the previous generation who inspired us! Don't let the few judge the whole.
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SFC Observer   Controller/Trainer (Oc/T)
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Some are too proud to ask for help as it could be seen as a sign of weakness. Some are too scared to ask for help as it could be seen as a sign of weakness. Some are too tired of getting the runaround and screwed every time they cough.
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Cpl Justin Sowell
Cpl Justin Sowell
6 y
Yes! So as a community how do we do we address this? How do you reprogram someone who was programmed to "suck it the f*** up" into accepting the concept that we all need a helping hand, and it is ok to ask if you truly need it? In a combat sense I get it, but that mindset will kill you in the civilian world.
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CW4 Angel C.
CW4 Angel C.
6 y
Yep and others simply don't ask. "You have not cause you ask not".
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SSG Roger Ayscue
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First they listen to the WRONG PEOPLE. Most never heard of the DAV, or the VFW. Most never thought to go to the Veterans Services Officer at the County Courthouse in most every county in the country. The Veterans Services Officer is a One Stop for info and assistance.

Most that struggle try to consult Facebook, social media and get discouraged because no one is too busy to gripe and bitch, but most are too busy to help out.
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Cpl Justin Sowell
Cpl Justin Sowell
6 y
I've noticed that most VSO's are word of mouth, and the VFW has a bad reputation among many young veterans. Most young veterans get the idea that the VFW is just a bunch of salty pissed off Vietnam Vets who drink and gamble. Perception plays a lot into that. I'll have to look into the resources offered by the county services officer as I have never heard of that. That sounds like some good info to have in your pocket. I have heard of the DAV, but again I think the perception is that you have to be disabled to receive assistance. There is an insane amount of resources available to veterans, but most either don't know they exist or don't take advantage of them when they need.
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