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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Mar 1, 2023
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LTC Trent Klug
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What they are saying is they want zero military personnel to have privately owned weapons in their homes. Either on post, base, or off-post housing.
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MAJ Byron Oyler
MAJ Byron Oyler
8 mo
SFC Greg Witte - People are more afraid of fraternization charges today than taking care of soldiers. I did some off roading with one of my specialists and even met him for shooting in the desert. Both things my leadership would have severely frowned upon but I knew him and what was going on in his life. We were not friends and he never called me by my first name and vice versa but I knew him. Need to be more favorable with things like this and really learn your SM.
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MSG Gregg Clement
MSG Gregg Clement
8 mo
Exactly what they want
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LTC Trent Klug
LTC Trent Klug
7 mo
MAJ Byron Oyler Well done!
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MSgt Tim Ulery
MSgt Tim Ulery
2 mo
PO3 Justin Bowen How can you not see that? 25 yoa to buy a gun? Waiting periods? Open your eyes
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CWO4 Terrence Clark
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You are likely surprized that I choose to file these recommendations in the bullsh*t! locker.
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Sgt Ed Allen
Sgt Ed Allen
1 y
BS - Repealing and replacing a law that prohibits the defense secretary from collecting or recording any information related to firearms or ammunition privately owned by a service member or DOD civilian employee.

Hmmm. Wouldn't that violate the Federal law against a gun registry?

Agreed - Standardizing DOD-approved firearm safety training so it covers topics such as suicide prevention, safe gun use and storage, and other best practices.

This should have been the priority for the last 200 years. Commanding officers, officers in general, and all NCOs should be looking after their men and women already.

Implementing a seven-day waiting period for any firearm purchased on DOD property.

BS - The person would just go off base and make the purchase. Why would this prevent suicides? It is just another BS maneuver to control the firearms.

Lots of BS - Implementing a four-day waiting period for ammunition purchases on DOD property after the purchase and receipt of a firearm bought on DOD property.

Once again, if you wanted to engage in violence against yourself, or anybody else, you would just go off base and purchase the ammo.

Super BS - Raising the minimum age to 25 years for purchasing firearms and ammunition on DOD property.

This is a violation of your constitutional rights. Interesting that in many states, they are no passing laws to allow 18 - 20-year olds to purchase firearms if they are a non-resident because they have the training on how to handle a firearm. But the DOD is thinking that you don't have the ability to be safe doing so.

ULTRA BS - Requiring anyone living on DOD property in military housing to register all privately owned firearms with the installation’s arming authority and to securely store all privately owned firearms in a locked safe or with another locking device.

Once again, infringing on your 2nd Amendment rights to have a firearm, and in this case, making it so that you would not have it available to you should you need it for self-defense. I absolutely agree with having it locked in a safe of some type. It can be an RFID, biometric, PIN Code or key activated storage device. This would be common sense and would keep children and thieves from gaining easy access to it. However, I disagree with PMO holding it.

BS - Establishing DOD policy restricting the possession and storage of privately owned firearms in military barracks and dormitories.

This rule was already in place in the 1980s, when I was serving, and it did not prevent one of my fellow marines from getting a gun and shooting himself in the head at the end of the flightline at Cherry Point. It provided a false sense of security. What if he had decided to start shooting people in the barracks instead. None of my fellow marines would have been able to defend themselves from an attack.


You will notice that the vast majority of recommendations in the report have to do with restricting the rights of service members. Very few of the recommendations have anything to do with mental health and actual suicide prevention.

A person who is suicidal will use whatever means is available. Knife, pills, rope, broken glass, alcohol, and, yes, even guns. It is not the choice of the tool that needs to be looked at and regulated. It is the actual responsibility of those around to watch their friends, fellow soldiers, marines, airmen, and sailors.

As service members, you are your brothers keeper. You should pay attention to what your barracks mates are doing and saying. There is almost always a sign that was seen but dismissed by saying it "isn't my responsibility". As a service member, it is your responsibility. If you were in combat, you would watch each other's back. You need to do it in garrison as well.
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CWO4 Terrence Clark
CWO4 Terrence Clark
1 y
Sgt Ed Allen Exactly! There are ample examples of failure of laws and regulations. Nothing replaces personal accountability, and nothing replaces leadership and accountability from E-1 to JCS.
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PO1 Kevin Dougherty
PO1 Kevin Dougherty
12 mo
Nailed it ...
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CSM Darieus ZaGara
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Not IAW the second amendment. It is truly very sad when a Service member ( or anyone) takes their own life, that does not however mean that the rights of others should be impeded. If this would be the case then we would have no civil rights.
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MAJ Byron Oyler
MAJ Byron Oyler
8 mo
MSG Stan Hutchison Yes we gave up rights while serving however the powers that be keep missing is we take people sometimes with few skills, inner weakness, and build them up to achieve the mission no regardless the challenges. When that mission becomes suicide being focused on a means or a tools and not understanding the person in pain is where we fail. Until mental health experts learn we function different these suicides are not going down and thus the reasons suicides are greater than after WWII. We approached people different at that time when you could mail order a rifle from Sears.
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SGT John Schmelzkopf
SGT John Schmelzkopf
4 mo
First IMO, the Suicide rates have nothing or minimal to do with access to Firearms. We went through same after Nam and after Our Leaderships despicable sell out of Our Service. We never lost a Battle but lost the War! You come home to live with being Sold Out by your Country. Your Brothers Killed or Seriously Wounded, some died in your arms, for what, A Cowardly Leadership Command that would not take Responsible Action.
For example, from what I have heard and seen, Who the Hell put that Fiasco together, pick your Weakest Spot for the Few Remaining Troops to gather for withdrawal. Obvious it was either total stupidity by WH, Milli Vanilli, Austin and others, or Cowardice, run for the hills, it would not be PC to stop the Tali with a few Strafing Runs. We had that in Nam toward end, If VC had a few Saffron Robes amongst, it became a Nofire, even if you saw Weapons. Leave all that Gear behind, who came up with that one? I never thought of Suicide but I was very angry then and to this day, we needed to bomb North Vietnam after the Paris Peace Talks Failed to get a full accounting of POW's. Kissinger, "The Great Negotiator", gave a List of Likely Survived (about 380 if I remember right) at the beginning of the Talks, guess who we got back, brilliant MOVE ! We left at least a thousand unaccounted for, I always use the Airforce Weapons Officer's as example, they were valuable Intel and usually went straight to Russia.
The Suicide Programs are tricky, again in my opinion, the constant talk and Commercials can in themselves keep bringing the Thoughts back. Remember the Gunlock ones that claimed a Gun Lock could stop you, well imo it Brought Firearms and Suicide thoughts together.
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SPC Zoe Jane Halo
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SSG John J Accornero
SSG John J Accornero
2 mo
Well said,
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