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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Oct 29, 2014
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MG Commanding General
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Better body armor and vehicles coupled with state of the art medical treatment leads to people surviving at a much higher rate resulting in more survivors with disabilities
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MAJ Dallas D.
MAJ Dallas D.
8 y
BG Reinert - I think you have it the nail on the head. I saw a statistic where we have service members surviving the loss of limb than in our history.
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SGM Mikel Dawson
SGM Mikel Dawson
7 y
We probably saw a jump in this area during the Korean war from WWII due to the helicopter and the M.A.S.H. units. Improved combat medics, addition of combat life savers(army) have to make a difference.
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LCDR Vice President
LCDR (Join to see)
7 y
Completely agree when my wife Capt Sharon Wright worked for the Trauma Registry and talking about her experience as a trauma nurse in Balad we have come to the same conclusion. If Gettysburg was fought today I bet 80% of the dead would be disabled instead but at least alive. This is a good news story General.
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1SG Training Coordinator
1SG (Join to see)
7 y
Sir, I think all of your points combined with the fact that we have been at a continuous state of hostilities longer than any other time in our countries history (with service members having multiple deployments to the combat zone) has resulted in the record number of service connected disabilities.
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MAJ Jim Woods
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A lot of it is the diagnosis for combat related injuries and illnesses is much better and the VA is more receptive now. After 2 tours in VN I was having problems with dreams, sleeping, and attitude. I went to the Hospital at McConnell AFB (I was a Reserve Advisor) and the Psychiatrist told me I had "Battle Fatigue" but I would get over it soon. He gave me some sleeping pills and I never saw him again. I tried the VA System in the 70's (Bad Behavior and Agent Orange) and was turned down. They said it wasn't service connected so "go home and stop crying".

Fast forward to 2004 when I was diagnosed with PTSD by a CIVILIAN PSYCHOLOGIST! I then went to the VA and they were not the same VA I tried in 1970's. I initially got into the VA system through the Military Order of the Purple Heart. In the 70's a PH didn't mean anything to them. I was fast tracked to the Mental Health and Compensation Dept's and was receiving 20% disability benefits within 3 months. Then, after all the tests and prodding/poking it was raised to 40% (Service Connected) and I now get VA Physicals every 6 months and all my meds are taken care of.

My own personal experience is very positive after being turned down in the 70's. I do see more Iraq and Afghanistan Vets getting more aggressive care than us old guys......LOL! Thats a good thing in my book.
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Cpl Dennis F.
Cpl Dennis F.
8 y
That story sure sounds familiar. Only I didn't get back to the VA until about 2010.
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PO1 Walter Duncan
PO1 Walter Duncan
8 y
Glad it worked out well for you. My cousin did not have it so well. He fought tooth and nail with the VA over PTSD and his Agent Orange. He tried to commit suicide by jumping from an interstate overpass. Luckily it did not work. But, another VN Vet heard about him and employed him with good insurance to get him help. He soon was in much better shape and lived a much happier life for a few years. But, of course he was diagnosed with cancer and passed away several years back and no doubt it was because of AO. But, thanks to the kindness of another one of us Vets he enjoyed his last few years with his family and grandkids. Was truly a blessing. The VA not so much.
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Sgt Field Radio Operator
Sgt (Join to see)
7 y
Sir, I did not try the VA again until 2014, when a VFW VSO helped me file an Agent Orange claim.
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Sgt David G Duchesneau
Sgt David G Duchesneau
7 y
I know exactly what you all are saying. I went to the VA in 1971 and man, was I totally disgusted with those guys and their "who gives a shit" attitude. I never went back until my Doctor told me to after being diagnosed with cancer and that took some time. I finally went back in 2010 and what a difference. Their attitude was entirely different and now I am in their care. Maybe, just maybe if their attitudes would of been more sympathetic back when I first went, the bastards, my cancer would of been diagnosed earlier and would of been treated well before all of the damn damage occurred. Oh well, I guess better late than never? At least I know that I am in good company!
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MAJ Dallas D.
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I know the number of service connected disabilities has risen. I know the injuries run the gambit as well. I am a member of the DAV and WWP Alumini and I know our numbers are growing everyday. This is the longest we have ever been at war as a country, this is the outcome.
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