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Maj John Bell
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Annually, 11% of the fatalities of law enforcement officers are by unarmed assailants. In general, my opinion is that whether or not an assailant is armed or not is irrelevant. Under any given set of circumstances, was it reasonable for a law enforcement officer to believe that their was a significant possibility that an unarmed assailant posed a serious threat, including disarming the officer and using his side arm against him/her. Annually, 11% of the fatalities of law enforcement officers are by unarmed assailants.

I did not hear the case, or see all the evidence, but I believe in the justice system. Until someone convinces me otherwise, I assume justice was served. That said, I expect that for some time, there will be good people who are reluctant to pursue careers in law enforcement.
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Maj John Bell
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MSG Signal Support Systems Chief
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Maj John Bell - no brother I was just stating my opinion. I am hoping moving forward all are held accountable for their actions.
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A1C Air Transportation
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A police officer has many tools in their belt the first of which is training. They should be trained in basic apprehension of suspects. Next is pepper spray and/or a taser. Lethal force should be the last option and had the officer kept his weapon holstered the chances of him being “disarmed” is highly unlikely. Keep in mind the man was not only unarmed but ALSO naked. Unless he’s hiding a knife in his rear he’s not a major threat.

Your logic of blindly trusting law enforcement simply because
they SHOULD do the right thing is wrong and damaging. Imagine if this man was your son, father or brother. Even if he did do something wrong, do you feel justice would have been served if he was shot in the streets unarmed and naked?
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Maj John Bell
Maj John Bell
1 mo
A1C (Join to see) - When I was stationed at Marine Barracks Bangor, because of the nature of my duties, I attended Police Officer Survival Training (POST) course offered by the King County Sheriff's Dept, Seattle Police Dept, and The Los Angeles County Police Dept. Every law enforcement agency in America now hires officers who have successfully completed some police academy. So any certified police academy graduate has successfully completed hours and hours of basic apprehension and suspect control. Upon being hired, any new hire, whether a rookie or a veteran law enforcement officer (LEO) , is going to receive additional training by the hiring agency in the agency specific protocols and policy.

When it comes to a street fight, and preventing a close contact assault, a LEO's first choice of weapon is likely to be the only choice that they get to make until the altercation is complete. Unfortunately, budget constraints mean that LEO's often begin confrontations alone and may continue to be alone for several minutes, particularly in rural settings. I believe you are misinformed if you believe it is difficult in close quarters for an assailant to gain control of a LEO's weapon.

An FBI study shows that each year, approximately 11% of the police officers killed by suspects were killed by unarmed suspects. so YES, ABSOLUTELY YES, an unarmed naked suspect is not only a major threat, every LEO should assume the naked unarmed man is a potentially LETHAL threat.

Further, when dealing with mentally-ill patients and patients on illicit drugs, even when the taser is properly deployed and fully functional the taser fails to prevent the suspect from continuing the fight approximately 30% of the time. Finally, when you are being charged by someone intent on doing you harm, and your choice was pepper spray, I think your belief that a direct hit in the face, or even upper chest is unlikely; and is not immediately disabling. I can also assure you from personal grappling experience that once I have a grip on you, it no longer matters if I can see you or not.

Each course taught the same basic premise, the Observe-Orient-Decide-Act (OODA) Loop. Even with a weapon (lethal or non-lethal) in hand, facing the suspect, and braced for a potential attack an officer will probably not be able to prevent a close contact assault if the perpetrator is within 30-50 feet if the pathway is unobstructed.

I did not say I blindly trust law enforcement. If you read my initial post I said "I did not hear the case, or see all the evidence, but I believe in the justice system. Until someone convinces me otherwise, I assume justice was served." That means I do not question the jury's decision in this case. But if I were young an considering a career in law enforcement, I'd probably do something else. I don't care who you are if you resist arrest and get injured or killed, even if you are my hypothetically naked, unarmed, mentally ill son, you don't get a lot of sympathy, even if the LEO was guilty of simple negligence.

Imagine if your son was a law enforcement officer (my son-in-law was, Lansing PD) and you had to bury him and help his wife, your daughter, raise your grandchildren because he chose less than lethal force, when he should not have. Fortunately, I didn't have to do that, but he had to be medically retired at 33 because an unarmed assailant destroyed his knee.
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SGT English/Language Arts Teacher
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Disturbing to say the least.
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A1C Air Transportation
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Good! It’s time to start holding police accountable for their actions. This is just a drop in the bucket but hopefully a start
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