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SFC Vet Technician
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Lack of sleep has been shown in numerous studies, to have negative effects on performance..performance that can be critical in a combat environment. Unfortunately, in today's "dial-it-up-to-11" society, it is quickly becoming the norm. We are spending more and more time trying to push the limits on what we can handle. Long work days push soldiers to find more time to unwind, and a lot of this unwinding is done online in social media, playing computer games, and watching more TV/movies then ever. The blue screen "toxicity" further effects our circadian rhythm and sleep habits. This, in turn, leads to a cycle of caffeinated energy drinks in the morning, poor, high-carb diets and then a return to the blue screen of technology at night.

I am not sure what the answer is to this problem..but it is a problem.
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MAJ Hospitalist Physician Assistant (Pa)
MAJ (Join to see)
6 y
Concur. Managing downtime, even your own, esp. in a deployment is a real challenge.
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Maj John Bell
Maj John Bell
6 y
MAJ (Join to see) - It must be because I am old. This is how my PltSgt managed sleep cycles on deployment and the SNCOIC on duty managed sleep cycles in garrison: "G--- D---- It MAGGOTS!!! I said lights out and shut the hell up! If I come back in here again, we'll be doing a 15 mile force march tonight!" One time somebody laughed. Fifteen minutes later on the hangar deck of The USS Inchon, underway, with full ALICE packs, nobody was laughing. Somebody bitched and it turned into a 20 miler. The next morning at morning quarters, he made a point of asking everyone if the understood the value of a good nights rest when it was available. And yes, I marched with the platoon.
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SPC Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
SPC Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
>1 y
i remember when i was on active duty one of my bunk mates (there were three of us in a room) had some form of insominia. he'd walk about the room all night in shower shoes. some nights I'd go to my car to sleep because he just could never just lay in his bad.

he'd wall all around our small quarters all night dragging his feet. I remember he later was getting tested for why he was always falling asleep during the day.
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SPC David Stephenson
4
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Edited >1 y ago
Not sure if the military did it or I'm just broke - 2-3 am to 7 am is all I get. If I go to bed at 10 pm I'll be up at 2 am. I know as well that poor sleep and weight gain go hand in hand. It would be interesting to see the Army track weight and sleep.
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MAJ Hospitalist Physician Assistant (Pa)
MAJ (Join to see)
6 y
Cortisol level, a stress hormone, go up with sleeplessness and weight follows.
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Capt Tom Brown
Capt Tom Brown
6 y
SPC David Stephenson I wake up every day at 3am (0300) no matter when I go to bed 7 days a week. Thought I was the only one for awhile. Have been out of the service since 1977 and still trying to get caught up on my sleep.
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SPC Kenneth Koerperich
SPC Kenneth Koerperich
6 y
My wife hates me. Go to bed, asleep in 5 min, up 5-6 hours later & work all day, err, nights now. Still in the "Military" mode for sleep, & the fact I can do it anywhere I lay my head doesn't make her happy either.

Hehe!
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CPT Mark Gonzalez
3
3
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Many leaders operate with sleep deprivation for years and it becomes our new normal. We will self medicate with caffeine and other products and push ourselves as life is not getting any easier, but I don't recommend you push forever. After getting help for my sleep issues, I feel amazing. The quality of life difference is dramatic and I'm better prepared in all aspects of life.
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MAJ Hospitalist Physician Assistant (Pa)
MAJ (Join to see)
6 y
What treatment made the most difference for you?... if you don't mind sharing
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