Posted on Mar 4, 2020
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I joined US Army to be 17A, but I had to choose another MOS which is 92Y because I didn't have citizenship and degree. So I thought that join Army for different MOS until I get my citizenship and go to OCS. I have only 9 credit hours to finish my degree, so my plan is finishing my degree in a year, by the time when I get citizenship after a year of service, I want to apply for OCS. And here are my questions.
1. I am majoring in Mathematics right now, should I change my major to Computer Science?
2. I heard that after I get into OCS, the scores I get from there would decide my MOS, and top 10 % of candidates would possibly have MOS they want. Is this Correct?
3. I have 94 ASVAB Score, would this help me to be 17A?
4. Let's assume I get my citizenship in May 2021, and apply for OCS. How long would I have to wait after all paperwork was submitted?
5. If there is any advice, it would be very helpful.

Thank you.
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2LT Military Police
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1. My personal opinion would be to keep your degree in mathematics since you are so close to graduating. What your degree in does not really matter at OCS. Anyone can branch into anything with all types of degrees. However, cyber has a different selection process and computer science may be more attractive to the cyber field. I honestly can’t attest to if either or would be more beneficial. My two cents would be to finish the degree you are already almost done with since you are so close but that’s just my opinion.

2. OCS works all on an OML (Order of Merit List). Everything you do at OCS is graded and all of your grades are kept track of. These grades determine your OML ranking, meaning that the better you do, the higher you will be on the OML. The OML only really matters for the active component candidates because these candidates compete for their jobs based off the OML. Essentially HRC authorizes a number of slots in each branch for each OCS class and the students compete for those slots. For example, if your class had 80 active duty candidates, HRC would allocate exactly 80 different branch slots to that class. These slots are a mixture of each branch the Army (with the exception of cyber, aviation, and medical services) has but it is all entirely dependent on needs of the Army. So if the Army is not in need of many signal corps LTs at the time, there will be less slots of those in the 80 total. It is completely up to needs of the Army in the allocations so you can have like 10 infantry slots, 8 ordnance slots, 3 MP slots, etc that will all in total make up the 80 slots. When it comes time to branch, the branching system works essentially like a draft. #1 person on the OML gets the first pick out of the 80 choices. The #2 picks from the remaining 79 choices so on and so forth. If you place really high on the OML, there is a high chance you will get your number 1 choice. I say really good chance because I placed in the top 10 of my class and received my second choice. With that being said, Cyber is not included in these branch allocations because they have their own specific selection process. You would have to apply through the cyber branch and complete whatever packed they have set forth separately. The Cyber branch reviews its own specific applicants and selects who they want in their corps.

3. Your ASVAB score is obviously pretty good but doesn’t play too big of an effect in getting accepted into either OCS nor Cyber (I would assume). It’s a general test set forth to measure your qualifications to see what jobs you could potentially pick from had you enlisted. The only scores that truly matter is your GT line score. You will need atleast a 110 GT score in order to even get accepted into OCS. There may be other updates like score requirements now but that’s the only one I know of for sure.

4. The whole application process takes a hot minute for OCS. By the time you begin your application to the time your school date begins, it will have been about a year if not longer. A majority of the application process is driven by you, so you can get a majority of it done on your pace. However, once it is turned in and awaiting review/approval, it’ll be completely out of your hands and will take a while to receive results. Be patient with the process because it is most definitely worth it.

5. If you want this bad enough, you will see it through. It’s not impossible but will be a challenging process. Don’t hesitate to ask questions or seek help with this! Your entire career is only driven by you!
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Thank you so much for your answer!
Your answers really helped :)
I appreciate your time and effort to write this long comment for my question.
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Cyber is a highly selective branch and has an accessions process DIFFERENT from all the other branches. Your best path may be to start out MI or SC and then apply to move over. You need to have both a technical aptitude and leadership skills. I was the president of the last RC 17A panel and the packets are very strong. Folks with multiple degrees, significant cyber work experience, and demonstrated leadership. Best of luck with the process.
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Thank you so much for your response sir.
The reason why I didn't choose MI for my first MOS is that I didn't have citizenship.
Therefore, I thought it would be better to have one of the most clerical job to have time and energy to finish my degree and study more about cyber. And I will plan to have computer science degree after my mathematics degree.
Based on your response, I got 2 major paths came into my mind, and those are,
1. Like what you said sir, after finish my degree and get citizenship, I would apply for OCS and be MI officer. Then, move to cyber branch.
2. Since I have 3 year and a half contract, I heard that I can renew my contract one and a half year before of my contract years, which is 2 years of service. When I have chance to renew my contract, and if I can move to 17C, Cyber Operation Specialist, and then be 17A.
I don't know which one is better right now, I prefer the first option, because I can get more experience as a leader before 17A, but if the second options is more likely and better to be 17A, I am willing to take it.
It would be great if you give me some advice about it.
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