Posted on Jan 9, 2014
CH (CPT) Heather Davis
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Traumatic childhood is a form of childhood PTSD? I would often lose my temper and have reactionary behavior this prevented me from being able to think methodical. I found out later I had intergenerational PTSD.
Edited >1 y ago
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Responses: 10
CW2 Joseph Evans
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A firm believer in it, which you know since we have made similar exchanges on other threads.
But to think it goes down to the DNA in a single generation or two is a little presumptuous. I recognize environmental impacts on Extra-DNA chemistry and RNA which have been known to impact emotional stability and brain chemistry. Chemistry which can force suppressed genetic markers to the top in successive generations if not countered early enough with treatment.
An interesting study for intergenerational PTSD may be the history and cultures of reservation bound Native Americans and their persistent persecution by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. As children and Grandchildren of WW II, Korean and Vietnam wars, the problem is still relatively fresh in terms of an intergenerational aspect compared to the descendents of the "Indian" Wars.
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CH (CPT) Heather Davis
CH (CPT) Heather Davis
>1 y
<p>Chief:</p><p><br></p><p>When I was a child I was a worrier and I was aggressive and lacked interpersonal skills. I would get frustrated very easy and was considered hyperactive.</p><p><br></p><p>The research that I have read shows the following:</p><p><br></p><p><span lang="EN" style='line-height: 120%; font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: HE;'><font color="#000000">Children
of&nbsp; parents with PTSD have higher risk of emotional, behavioral, academic
and interpersonal problems (Lev-Weisel, 2007).The children exhibits more
depression, anxiety, aggressiveness, act out, poor attitude towards others,
delinquent behavior, hyperactivity, practice self -destructive behavior and
have more difficulties forming and maintaining positive relationships.
According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2000) children of
Vietnam veterans with PTSD are more likely to use drugs and alcohol and they
are also three times more likely to attempt suicide than children from the
general population. Feeling disappointed, unsupported, unloved, rejected by a
parent who is emotionally numb, detached, psychologically absence and/or avoids
places/people/activities due to high anxiety may cause low self- esteem,
intensifies anxiety and depression and also reduces the child’s ability to
relate to others (Ruscio, Weathers, King, &amp; King, 2002). Irritability, low
frustration tolerance and aggressive behavior of the parent can lead the child
to question his own behavior and in extreme cases of violence even own
self-worth. It naturally also increases the probability of the child becoming
aggressive himself and developing a academic and interpersonal problems in
school (Harkness,1993). Some children realize that the parent is not able to
function well and they take over the parenting role. </font></span></p>
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CH (CPT) Heather Davis
CH (CPT) Heather Davis
>1 y
One of the most compelling arguments I’ve read supporting the intergenerational transference of PTSD is by Ken O’Brien, who cites several researchers, (Yehuda, et al) who have studied cortisol levels in PTSD sufferers and their children and have likely discovered bio-markers that support the argument that PTSD is genetically based and therefore heritable.
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MAJ Derrick J.
MAJ Derrick J.
10 y
DNA isn't the issue - the Family Transmission process is real and intergenerational.

Go to this thread for more info:

http://www.rallypoint.com/answers/re-cpt-davis-discussions-about-ptsd-trauma-and-related-concerns
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SSgt Forensic Meteorological Consultant
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Yes, I think this is so true.   Without going into detail,  I think I feel much of what my dad did.   There are neurological issues that seem to run in the family.
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CH (CPT) Heather Davis
CH (CPT) Heather Davis
>1 y
<p>SSGT. Olson,</p><p><br></p><p>You are not alone it is a genetic chemical that is passed down. That is why it is called intergenerational PTSD. If you inbox me I will send you papers that I wrote on this topic. </p><p><br></p><p>I bring it up because I have it and I have discovered many generational military families have it and do not know the serious impact.</p>
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CH (CPT) Heather Davis
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http://drsharongalor.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/the-impact-of-ptsd-on-the-children-intergenerational-transmission-of-trauma/
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