Posted on Aug 13, 2015
SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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The Connecticut Supreme Court on Thursday ruled the state's death penalty is unconstitutional. The deeply divided court's 4-3 ruling will affect the 11 inmates currently on the state's death row.

Lawmakers repealed the state's death penalty in 2012, but stipulated it only applied to future crimes. Plaintiffs in Thursday's case had argued the 2012 ban should also extend to prisoners already on death row.

The Supreme Court agreed to take up the law's prospective issue when it granted a request by Eduardo Santiago, whose death sentence was overturned two months after the repeal took effect. (Connecticut Department of Corrections)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/08/13/death-penalty-connecticut_n_7983488.html
Posted in these groups: Death penalty logo Death PenaltyState of Connecticut
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COL Mikel J. Burroughs
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SGT (Join to see) I believe in it 100%, now we just need to get rid of the red tape that goes along with it!
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MAJ Contracting Officer
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SFC (Join to see) - Probably best we wait a bit of time to see if any other material evidences can be found, but it certainly shouldn't last more than a year unless there is evidence to the contrary. Nearly 80 years without a single capital punishment overturn is a very, very high bar.
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SFC Owner/Operator
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MAJ (Join to see) - The time from arrest to end of the trail could take a year or more? This should be sufficient enough time to prove guilt without a doubt. Though I admit 24 hours is a bit quick. My point is ounce found guilty that's it! A speedy execution will deter similar crimes and prevent lawyers from stalling the execution.
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SFC Owner/Operator
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Many will disagree with this but I also feel the execution should be horrific, degrading, and televised. Executions should be used as a frightening deterrent to prevent criminals from looking for publicity and fame.
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SPC Kelley McMahan
SPC Kelley McMahan
6 y
Personally, and I know I am not popular for this opinion, but I like the way the Soviets handled this back in the day. You got a trial, if convicted, the next week the court went through every shred of paperwork on the case verifying there was no oversight errors. If that held up, you got an appeal within 3 days, if the appeal was denied, the guards (usually KGB, the blue epaulets gave them away) They knelt the condemned down in a shower in the back of the courthouse and put a single bullet through the base of their brain stem. End of file. Trial, sentencing, and execution are over and done within six weeks. And this appeal is televised, right along with the condemned escorted out and within two minutes you hear a single gunshot. And then the news commentators give the list of what the conviction was for and what this means for future criminals.
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LTC Stephen F.
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Edited 9 y ago
SGT (Join to see) I fully support the death penalty in all capital crimes especially where a human life is extinguished on purpose. Anybody who willfully and purposely kills another human being solely based on their own desires deserves to be executed. In past decades before DNA and other forensic science capabilities had matured some people were apparently wrongly convicted and executed - only God knows the whole truth in those and every other case for that mater.
It is ironic now that now DNA and other forensic science capabilities have matured that there is an effort to eliminate capital punishment.
Talk about a slow judicial process in Connecticut according to the article Eduardo Santiago was convicted in a 2000 murder-for-hire scheme and sentenced in 2012. Victims and accused should be afforded a speedy trial which begins soon after a suspect is apprehended with sufficient evidence to bring to trial. The public's right to know does not trump the privacy of the witnesses, accused, and victims. PO3 Steven Sherrill, SSG James J. Palmer IV aka "JP4"
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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That is my logic also LTC Stephen F.. If they clearly committed the crime beyond reasonable doubt, then let the appropriate punishment go quickly.
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SSG Eddye Royal
SSG Eddye Royal
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I believe in the death penalty for this reason, I was on AD in FT. Hood, Tx. July/ August 1991 when they had the Lubby’s killer. Me and a friend, another soldier from 1st CAV almost went in there to eat.

I will never forget that, the people lost there lives just to sit and eat for lunch. Now we “COUNTRY” is lock in a LEGAL or LEGISLATIVE Igbo with NRA, that show not be. I say where is the common sense to this, we should be able to say if you are deamed sain, then Government has the right to take life. I also look to the Bible.
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Capt Mark Strobl
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Edited 9 y ago
Before I start a firestorm, let me say this: The Death Penalty... I get it. However, the Death Penalty does not serve as a deterrent. Otherwise, people would stop doing things to qualify for its consideration. Codex Hammurabi served the Babylonians for slightly over 50-years... Why a First-World nation would embrace its sentiments are... well... beyond me. On the Death Penalty, I would have to put my emotions aside in effort to follow my moral compass. To this, I stand in support of the Connecticut Supreme Court: I'm OK with a convict given the opportunity of a lifetime to reflect on their missteps.
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SPC Margaret Higgins
SPC Margaret Higgins
9 y
You know, MSgt Brian Welch, I was abused/neglected by three 'parents' (including a Stepparent), both of my biological parents were alcoholics; I had rape forced upon me, was homeless for three summers, suffered MST in the Army....and yet I certainly am not committing crimes now....now granted, I have not been sinless in my past, nor sinless in my present. I have committed egregious sins; in my past. And I spent a LONG time repenting to GOD for them. (I reaffirmed my Baptismal vows....and repented after That even....however, us Episcopalians believe that GOD forgives our sins; once we have repented for them.)
Thanks for listening; Brian. Just trying to help others. It has been Very difficult to lay all of this out; knowing that the RP staff and public will see all of this.
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SSG Eddye Royal
SSG Eddye Royal
>1 y
I believe in the death penalty for this reason, I was on AD in FT. Hood, Tx. July/ August 1991 when they had the Lubby’s killer. Me and a friend, another soldier from 1st CAV almost went in there to eat.

I will never forget that, the people lost there lives just to sit and eat for lunch. Now we “COUNTRY” is lock in a LEGAL or LEGISLATIVE Igbo with NRA, that show not be. I say where is the common sense to this, we should be able to say if you are deamed sain, then Government has the right to take life. I also look to the Bible.
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SPC David Payne
SPC David Payne
>1 y
Whoever said that the death penalty was a deterrent? It's society's ONLY guarantee that person will NEVER harm another again. Period.
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CPT Jack Durish
CPT Jack Durish
6 y
Of course it is a deterrent. The executed never again commit any crime. Does it deter others? Maybe, but not crimes of passion wherein the perpetrator isn't thinking or acting rationally. The only thing that will deter that criminal is if the intended victim or another law abiding person uses deadly force to stop them.
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