Posted on Jun 10, 2017
1LT Physical Therapy Student
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As a newly minted O-1 I have no problem with the term, but some of my fellow ENS/LTs have been scolded for using it. I never considered the term a pejorative when I was enlisted and I still don't now that I'm on the officer side. I always thought it was sort of a rite of passage that goes along with being a new Officer. Am I missing something? Do you consider the term disrespectful or demeaning?
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SSG(P) Patient Service Tech
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Butter Bar. Jarhead. Squid. Dogface. POG. REMF. Puddle Jumper. Chair Force. Personally, if any of those names offends anyone in those categories, then their skin is a little too thin for this type of work and should probably seek life elsewhere. We either kills things or support those that kill things. If those names offends people, then how are they going to act/react when the bullets fly and the IEDs go off?
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CPL Owner
CPL (Join to see)
6 d
CW3 (Join to see) -
Mr. Lacoste,
I have to admit, since technical warrants are required to be E-6 or higher (any rank for aviation), I would just assume you are technical and be smart enough to realize that calling you spot is, in that case, disrespectful, and I would not refer to a warrant officer in that way. Even most aviation warrants are coming from an NCO background. I always treated Warrant Officers with more respect on average by default.

That all being said, I feel that butter bar wasn't ever a term of endearment, rather, just as I said: a reminder to not be a douchebag who thinks he knows everything and that rank somehow super matters with that 2LT. The 2LT can be smart and go into learning mode, have the plat daddy educate him and garner the respect correctly, or he can go the other way, and learn how the E-4 Mafia walks the line between getting the job done, and getting it done correctly. I've seen some 2LT's hang because the jobs were done to regs, but not to the standard that is really needed, which is always a bit more. Perfect examples of where those 2LT's can embrace the noob title and come on top, or live up to the noob title and get some shitty OER bullets.....

One last thing as well: spot should always be a reference to those special summer time warriors we all know and love.....the cadets! Yes, those dominator's of the summer FTX....commanders of the zealously desired "pack salute" from nervous privates.....the only ones to attain legitimately serious orthopedic injuries (and P3's?, haha) from warp factor salutes when they have been saluted incorrectly at distance. lol
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CW3 Property Book Officer (Pbo)
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CPL (Join to see) it’s true as you stated, as well I saw the LTC above mention that it’s a term used in private conversation. We still have customs and courtesies to adhere to. The “term of endearment” I mentioned is more historically a right of passage if you will. It was actually(for me anyhow) to get those wobbly one, dot, spot comments as it’s like most other things in the military we do: tradition (if you will) to obtain something, in this case rank, it means something different than a slur, again at least to me and those I’ve encountered. I can see today, where some would offended but realistically it’s like a tab you earn. Wear it with pride. This life is too short to get tied up in whimsical arguments over bitter bar, spy, and wobbly one. We share things in the military most will never understand. That’s what makes those who serve a special breed. This to me is just another one of those things. I do understand and appreciate your view point however, Thank you for the input.
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2LT Thomas Bertelsen
2LT Thomas Bertelsen
4 d
That’s what they were called, I was one for a bit after going in a PFC. everyone that made it to a Platoon with Men knew to listen to the Platoon Sgt. Then again sometimes it takes a LTC to spot a bunch of mop buckets on the roof of the building next to the barracks.
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HN Richard Duncan
HN Richard Duncan
4 d
I have been out since 1991, it took me a little while what Butter Bar meant. If you CO's are triggered but Butter Bar maybe you should find another profession. When I served from 86 to 91 we were not PC. I for one glad I served when men where men and women where women.
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LT Brad McInnis
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Frankly, if an officer finds it offensive then there is probably a reason (hint: the officer is the one that is offensive). In all my time, I found that enlisted service members are fair. If you treat them with common decency you will get the same. The officers I found that had problems, had problems because they were the problem.
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TSgt Gwen Walcott
TSgt Gwen Walcott
24 d
1LT Kurt Mccarthy - fuzzy? That's a new one. Rainbow, yes
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1SG Craig Dimeler
1SG Craig Dimeler
20 d
I don't see a problem with use of the term in casual conversations... it beats the heck out of being called buttercup or snowflake. That said when I was a First Sergeant I referred to all LTs as "Lieutenant" and used "sir or ma'am" after they've demonstrated their ability to listen and take direction from their senior leaders especially senior NCOs. When they acted like a know-it-all I'd allow them fail gracefully... sooner or later they would wise up (most of them)!
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1LT Kurt Mccarthy
1LT Kurt Mccarthy
11 d
TSgt Gwen Walcott - In basic there isn't any rank on the ACU or OCP, so we call them fuzzies at Sand Hill.
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2LT Thomas Bertelsen
2LT Thomas Bertelsen
4 d
They could have their cheek caressed.
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1LT William Clardy
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Q: What has a soldier wearing mosquito wings accomplished that a butter bar hasn't?
A: He's been promoted.
If you can't ridicule yourself every now and then, you will never learn one of the most effective ways to overcome fear and stress.
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CDR Kenneth Kaiser
CDR Kenneth Kaiser
6 mo
I was in the reserves as enlisted for three years before I went to OCS. While I was in OCS my concentration was in making it out the other end. On the day of graduation I suddenly realized that the Navy would expect me to know all of that stuff they taught me in OCS (Hey I was much younger then) When I got to the fleet my chief told me that the second most dangerous thing in the world was an Ensign with a pencil. The most dangerous thing he said was an Ensign with a pencil with an eraser on it. It sort of put the world in perspective for me.
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TSgt Alex Barkey
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SFC William Turner
SFC William Turner
25 d
I held the rank of Corporal E-4 for a while. It was because I was in an E-6 Staff Sgt. slot. The senior NCOs had to figure out that a 2 stripe Corporal was an NCO, although a very junior one. It was very interesting and very instructive. I was usually put in charge of menial details like cleaning the latrines, picking up pine cones, etc. The SP4s didn't like that arrangement but had no choice. When it came to moving troops to and from class I had 2 SP5s in my detachment. They put me in charge of the formation. I was routinely called a "Double Gnat Wing". I took it as a recognition of my rank with pride. When I made SGT E-5 it was all over anyway.
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LTC G4
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As long as the 2LT is not addressed directly as "butter bar", just referenced to, fine. I hate to here people, even seniors, address newly commissioned officers as "LT" (eltee)........just as I hate to hear SGT addressed as "Sarge"....
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