Tesla Motors
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With the drop in oil prices and innovation around electric vehicle technology, how do you see the growth and expansion of sustainable transportation?

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Responses: 44
CPT Jack Durish
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I would love to have an electric vehicle, but... (Yes, there's a "but" and it's a big one) it must have a range of at least 300 miles and be rechargeable in the same amount of time as it takes to fill a tank with gas. I know it sounds as though my "but" makes it appear that I'm not serious about wanting an electric vehicle, but I believe that my requirements will soon be met. I have seen recent news of super capacitors which could retain a sufficient charge to meet my range requirements (even on a hot night with lights and air conditioning running) and could be recharged, even without stopping. Batteries will never meet my requirements and there is on 300 mile extension cord. Oh yes, and the price must be reasonable. Keeping in mind that the maintenance would be much less than an internal combustion engine and there would be no more costly gas, I would be willing to pay more than I might for a comparable gas-fueled car.
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MSgt Christopher Maddaloni
MSgt Christopher Maddaloni
4 y
PV2 Scott Goodpasture - I have never claimed to be smartest person in the room, but I do know what I don't know. I don't know if I have ever seen a Tesla car on the road in my area. The $100+k price tag is one reason. As far as one for $35k that actually works and doesn't need full battery replacement in a few years of use. I'll believe it when I see it. Green energy is still a dream for mass market use. US government has spent hundreds of millions of dollars in private company subsidies and garanteed loans to; Solyndra, Abound Solar, A123 Systems Inc, and Fisker. All have failed miserably. It's a great idea, just not a reality in 2016. I wish it did work, it's just not in the cards right now.
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Sgt Jay Jones
Sgt Jay Jones
4 y
CPT Jack Durish I am in total agreement with you. Another caveat to an electric vehicle is the noise factor. Let's also not forget the help it will give to our dying planet, from man's abuse. Excuse me I digressed. I think this century we will come in on fossil fuels and leave on another dominant energy source, if the Lord delays his coming. Oops, I digressed again.
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Sgt Jay Jones
Sgt Jay Jones
4 y
Why so many naysayers to PV2 Scott Goodpasture and CPT Jack Durish. We are Americans! We rise to the challenges. We let the industrial might of the good ole American Industry come alive and meet these challenges. It may not happen in my lifetime, but IT WILL HAPPEN. This planet will ensure it happens. Let look to the future instead of yesterday and today! We are the greatest country on earth. Nothing is insurmountable for us except our own doubts.
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PV2 Scott Goodpasture
PV2 Scott Goodpasture
4 y
Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS - Hey if your secure enough in your manhood to drive a KIA who the hell am I to point and laugh
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CPT Infantry Officer
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That is pretty bad ass. I would like to have one in the future. It is a matter of time until they are common. I really admire Tesla for doing what they are doing. They are leading the way in this.
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Capt Richard P.
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Edited 4 y ago
In the long run oil prices will rise again, they are driven by a finite resource with an infinite demand. Internal Combustion Engines are a very mature iteration of a low technology energy transfer.

The end of the carbon economy is inevitable and I see Tesla as working to accelerate that end, to everyone's benefit. I'm excited about the construction of the gigafactory and the introduction of the middle-market model 3 for the rest of us!
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Capt Richard P.
Capt Richard P.
4 y
MAJ (Join to see) In order 1. Power production that comes out the outlet depends on the local mix, and the dirtiest of powerplants powering nothing but Teslas will still pollute less on net than a fleet of comparable ICE engine cars (economies of scale). 2. The tech may not be new (not sure which part of my comments led to that point) but it has not been implemented at scale, Tesla is working toward that. 3. Tesla batteries are safe (there were less penetration induced battery fires total ever (3) in Teslas than gasoline fires in cars in any given day) are becoming more economical (hence my mention of the gigafactory to scale and make the model 3) and they are definitely replaceable. I'm not a fan of hydrogen for individual cars, whats the point of exchanging one compressed highly flammable explosive liquid or gas for another?
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MAJ Contracting Officer
MAJ (Join to see)
4 y
Capt Richard P. It's the cost and environmental impact of the battery. I'd love to support Tesla, but I think it will go the way of the Prius and when seen for the long term operating costs people will go elsewhere.
Hydrogen is nice because it gets the enviro benefits without the battery costs, there is the whole explosion thing to be worked out.
France has done well with compressed air power vehicles, I'd love a commuter vehicle that ran on air.
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Capt Richard P.
Capt Richard P.
4 y
MAJ (Join to see) I hear you, and the Prius is certainly a good choice. Tesla is exciting and new, and someday I will own one, but it will be a while. I think batteries are the long term answer, along with self driving. Think about the stabilization for the energy grid to have that many batteries to draw power when its cheap and discharge it when its expensive...
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MCPO Roger Collins
MCPO Roger Collins
4 y
MAJ (Join to see) - Agree with the hydrogen, and it is proven technology. Natural gas is another good option. We are a long way from wind and solar on a commercial basis for many reasons.
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