Posted on Nov 27, 2013
CPT Mike M.
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<p>Among those in a position that grants them a personal office, I've heard a few individuals say that they prefer not to hang things on their walls because it feels too narcisistic - like they're giving themselves a pat on the back.&nbsp; The counter to that argument that I personally agree with is that putting plaques, coin holders and things like that up in your office is that it's not for you, it's for your Soldiers.&nbsp; It's important for them to see where you came from and what you've accomplished.&nbsp; I don't know how many times someone has walked into my office, noticed something on the wall or on my desk and it's been a point of conversation.&nbsp; It's a small Army and often times they've been in the same place at some point in time.&nbsp; It creates an additional bond from a shared past experience.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>What are your thoughts?&nbsp; Any stories out there of an interesting connection you've experienced that would have gone unknown had it not been for your "office flair"?</p>
Posted in these groups: Us medals AwardsAccomplishments Accomplishments
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Responses: 18
CMC Robert Young
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<p>Sir, I had an assignment that offered&nbsp;the SNCOs their own&nbsp;offices. I started with a couple framed school certificates and photos. All of the chiefs got into it a little along.&nbsp;Each chief had their own personal touches, and before it was over&nbsp;each&nbsp;office was full. There were plaques, and awards, and photos, and framed calligraphy words of wisdoms and quotes along with nautical memorabilia &amp; nav charts of the AOR, and recruiting posters. It was all very well&nbsp;done; something&nbsp;in which we all took great pride.&nbsp;(We found a&nbsp;professional framing shop that loved the military &amp; spent a fortune there.) But then it got really good! The crew, in addition to asking about&nbsp;the things displayed in&nbsp;the&nbsp;chiefs' offices,&nbsp;started taking pictures of the unit in action which they framed.&nbsp;They located and framed copies of the unit's citations.&nbsp;They framed and mounted a USGC Meritorious Unit Pennant and created a Boat Force Memorial plaque. They&nbsp;put up all of this&nbsp;in the passageways and squad bay. They&nbsp;painted the unit's crest on the squad bay floor. The crew took so very much pride in the unit's facilities. I have never seen anything like before or since. It built&nbsp;such a sense of spirit de corps because the crew took ownership after seeing the chiefs' work spaces. We were part of a multi service mission and as a result&nbsp;received regular visits from senior leaders of all five services. All who visited complimented the crew and the facilities. For us it was a good thing.</p>
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SSgt Forensic Meteorological Consultant
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That stuff increases pride in the unit and fodder for conversation along the way.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; We forecasters were relegated to surface and upper air charts. lol.&nbsp;&nbsp; Nice story SCPO Young.
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CMDCM Gene Treants
CMDCM Gene Treants
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When we built USS Anzio (CG-68) in Pascagoula, MS at Ingalls Shipbuilding we really did not know how much we were going to get into. &nbsp;Anzio was named after the Battle of Anzio, Italy and during our research we discovered that 22 people received the Congressional Medal of Honor during this one Battle; we were able to get, mount and display at various places throughout the ship the Citations that went to each recipient of The Medal. &nbsp;This was just the beginning of the Pride that each Sailor assigned to Anzio developed as he was welcomed aboard and assigned the task of reading each Certificate. &nbsp;On Commissioning Day, Members of the Anzio Veterans Association were invited and received as honored guests. &nbsp;Anzio is tied to her Veterans and this commitment has caused a tremendous pride in being a member of the ship.<h1 style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: normal; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 1.167em; font-family: proxima-nova-bold, 'helvetica Neue', helvetica, arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(247, 246, 242);"><br></h1>
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CPT Keith Steinhurst
CPT Keith Steinhurst
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Roger that Senior Chief - very well done!
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1SG Johnny Carter
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Sir, I was one of those individuals who thought the same about the bragging and pat on the back if I did the flair deal so I didin't. But one day my BDE CDR can for a visit and asked me why was my walls bare. I told him that I didnt need to put stuff on my wall to brag about myself that my positon and rank would do it for me. He then shut my door and said listen here 1SG, How are Soldiers who come this great unit suppose to see what you have done to get here. Hell any candy ass can be a 1SG but not all candy asses can be leaders! I was like damn he said candy ass!lol So that weekend I got a few plaques and put them up. Next thing I know when I got a new Soldier he asked about one and generated conversation that lead to him saying one day he will have plaques. SO I guess BDE CDR was right and now I have Soldiers gunning to be the best. Now don't get me wrong I havd to work the plaques around my Alabama pictures but hey it all worked out.
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CSM Brigade Command Sergeant Major
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Office flair, I'm good with it. Its like wearing your badges on your uniform, shows a sense of pride in what you done and who you did it with. Soldiers are looking for mentors and if a framed company guidon starts a conversation about what it takes to be a 1SG the mission accomplished. Its all about marketing Army style. Lure them in with your flair and mentor them on who to get there. I recall telling a 1SG once how I was impressed with his MSM. After that we talked for a good 45 minutes. He is still a mentor to this day. All started with office flair.
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CPT Mike M.
CPT Mike M.
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I agree. &nbsp;There's a difference between arrogance and pride in your significant accomplishments. &nbsp;If you have them on your wall for those to see, that's different than an individual who just loves telling their own war stories about how awesome they are.
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