Posted on Dec 7, 2015
SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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I could have told the study that counciling for PTSD wasn't a cure. At least not for me. According to this article, over 35 years and 900 veterans later, still had symptoms of PTSD, after successfully completing one on one or group sessions. I'm better than I was before I got group and one on one sessions, but not cured. It's really hell to live with. Not only for me, but my wife too.


Post-traumatic stress disorder is one of the most complex and troubling psychiatric issues that veterans face. Roughly 15 percent of Iraq and Afghanistan vets are diagnosed with the disorder; veterans of the Persian Gulf and Vietnam wars face comparable rates.
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Preferred talk therapy treatments for PTSD include cognitive processing therapy and prolonged exposure. Generally referred to as CPT and PE, these first-line treatments focus on the traumatic event as a way to reduce distress. They are the most studied treatments for service members, and guidelines for behavioral health clinicians in the Veterans Affairs and Defense departments recommend use of these types of treatments for PTSD.

http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/benefits/health-care/2015/12/07/kevlar-mind-ptsd-treatments-spotty-success/76773890/
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SGT Patrick Reno
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Had a great friend at the VFW, He passed away last year at 92. We were talking a couple of years ago about movies. I ask him what he thought of Saving PVT. Ryan. He told me he can't watch war movies because it gives him nightmares. He served in the Pacific and in Europe during WW2. Over 60 years later it still affected him. PTSD doesn't go away.
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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I've never a war movie since I came home in '67. I went to the movies when Apocalypse Now came out and left within 30 minutes. It was the dumbest, most ridiculous thing I've ever seen. War movies depress me and piss me off at the same time for the stupid acting and scripts. I've never seen bullets make sparks when hitting plastic, like a Corvette.
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SGT Patrick Reno
SGT Patrick Reno
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All I do is pick out all the things that are wrong, uniforms , weapons that never run out of ammo.
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MSgt Curtis Ellis
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About to go into round 2 of "behavioral & life skills" counseling/group therapy...
whoop de freakin doo...
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
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MSgt Curtis Ellis - Interaction of the group is often more powerful than what the therapist says because we have the PTSD and we can relate to the military. Case in point about stress: I told the group how I dealt with stress. Imagine we are at the firing range and targets pop up which are stressors. The far away targets I can't hit I forget about them, the close ones I hit. The group being all veterans understood this. We don't need some therapist randomly spewing what they think is wrong about us.

This is a good thread!
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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When I went through back in the dark ages, my classes were five days a week, from 0800 to 1600, for six months. Then there was a second session I went through that was the same six months, five days a week. After that was alumni counciling, if you wanted to continue in the process. I did for a while, but wasn't getting much out of it, so I stopped going. Also, the councilors were changing all the time and I got tired of telling my story over and over.
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MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
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The crucial element for me was identifying my PTSD symptoms instead of swirling symptoms in order to create plans on how to fight the symptoms.
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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That's pretty much what the mental health people did for me. At first, it was all of my feelings wrapped into one. As I went deeper into the program, I began breaking my thoughts and actions into different parts to work on.
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SSG John Caples
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I WENT THROUGH THOSE , IT DOESN'T WORK I STILL SUFFER NIGHT MARES AND ANGER PROBLEMS ALONG WITH BOUTS OF DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY , THEY WANTED ME TO GO TO GROUP THERAPY IN A CONTROLED ENVIROMENT IN THE VA WHICH LAST 8 WEEKS TOLD THEM DID NOT WANT TO DO THAT. SUCKS TO BE THE SUCK
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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SSG John Caples, I went through that program. I went 16 weeks. The first 8 weeks was in a large group of about 15-20. Then another small group session for 8 weeks. They helped me tremendously. I still have thoughts about when I was in Vietnam, but not anymore nightmares. If you are drinking, stop. Liquor doesn't help. It makes it worse. One thing I did learn is that help is out there, and IF YOU, want to be helped, you have to take the first step. There are others in those sessions who are just like you. Nobody is going to come to your house and ask if you need help. You have to go to them. So, it's up to you. There are many here in RP, men and women, going through what you and I are going through. They have seeked help because they know, nobody is going to reach out to them, and offer help, except another vet. If you were offered to participate in the PTSD program, and you turned it down, you made a mistake. Do you realize how many vets, with your same problem, are trying to get that help? Yes, it sucks to be the suck, but it doesn't have to be that way the rest of your life. It's totally up to you brother. Talking about it on RP, is a good first step, but you need to walk that extra mile in your boots with others who walked that same mile, and did something about it. Good luck and God bless. BTW, everything capitalized in a message, is yelling. So, it looks like to me you are crying out for help. You came to the right place to get started, but it doesn't end here. Go for it. It's a win, win situation for you. Remember, it takes a real warrior to reach out for help,when they know they need help. Keith
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SSG John Caples
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I appreciate your concern, I went through the Cpt. in 2009 , I still suffer from these bouts of anger, depression, anxiety, every thing they have offered me I have accepted to do, and have been there getting the help I need. I just cannot be in that kind of environment and no I do not drink nor do I do drugs accept what the Va. gives me and that is 5 meds for the anxiety, anger, depression, and the night terrors. and the other meds for high blood pressure, heart disease, bulging herniated disc. and high cholesterol.
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