Posted on Sep 16, 2014
SGT(P) Squad Leader
5.14K
11
13
0
0
0
I coordinated with SSG Burns on this topic *SHOUT OUT*!
Our Company Commader sent us a slide show that states Military members have a higher rate of suicide compared to our civilian counterparts. Is it a fair comparison since most military members are in a profession that requires much more stress? Military members are only less than 1% of the population, so of course our rates look much higher than that of civilians.
Is it a fair comparison?
I hope you like my topic!

(I tried to add the slide, I'm not sure how to do it)

Very Respectfully,

SPC Michel
Posted in these groups: B4caadf8 Suicide
Avatar feed
Responses: 5
SGT Ben Keen
3
3
0
I have to disagree with CW5 (Join to see) and SGT(P) (Join to see); being a civilian doesn't mean you face less stress. You simply face different stresses. Sure you aren't getting shot at and things like that but the stress you face as a civilian can be just as high. Trying to find a job, trying to find your footing in a company, learning to live with your family, and so much more all add stress to you.

Now to the question of is the comparison between suicides rates between those serving in the military and civilians is fair, well it depends on how you rank the numbers. Are you saying percentages, raw numbers, or some thing else? While yes, the total population of service members is highly outnumbered by civilians, the numbers in both groups is way to high.
(3)
Comment
(0)
CW3 Dylan E. Raymond, PHR
CW3 Dylan E. Raymond, PHR
8 y
I agree with you Ben the Stresses would be different
(1)
Reply
(0)
PO3 Nicholas Bennett
PO3 Nicholas Bennett
2 y
I agree with you, it's a different kind of stress but just equally as important. If you can, see my post, I based it feom what I studied in psychology and sociology.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
CW5 Desk Officer
1
1
0
Having served 30 years on active duty, and now eight-plus years as a DA civilian, I can tell you that being a civilian is MUCH less stressful than being a Soldier. The difference, in my opinion, is like night and day, so - no, it's not a fair comparison. More and special attention needs to be paid to the military personnel in this regard, again, in my humble opinion.
(1)
Comment
(0)
SGT Ben Keen
SGT Ben Keen
8 y
Now, that I can agree with CW5 (Join to see), you can only speak from your personal experiences. And while getting shot at is probably the worse stress I ever face, being laid off two years and not knowing how fast I would find a job was pretty damn scary too.
(2)
Reply
(0)
SFC Boots Attaway
SFC Boots Attaway
8 y
Stress in my opinion is self made and stressing over something is a waste of time and energy. That being said it is a different matter when dealing with PTSD. Soldiers, police and other first responders are more likely to have PTSD than a civilian. Therefore the suicide rate among soldiers and first responders will be higher and needs to be addressed more,
(1)
Reply
(0)
Capt Retired
Capt (Join to see)
>1 y
Stress in the civilian community can also be extreme. Company closes jobs goes with it. Company is bought same. And it doesn't stop at retirement. Right my friend is sweating the loss of his pension due to a buy out.
(0)
Reply
(0)
SPC Safety Technician
SPC (Join to see)
>1 y
This answer depends on the individual. In the army, I was busier, worked harder and longer, and more was expected of me on a day-to-day basis.

But is the army more stressful that my life since I've left it? Hell no. The army was a lot easier on me as a person. I knew who I was and what I was doing, and so long as I tried hard and did my best, even if I had trouble with soldiers or patients, I never seemed to take the failures as hard as I do now as a civilian.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
PO3 Nicholas Bennett
0
0
0
I would say it is a fair comparison. Stigma has a lot to do with the situation. Leave it to military to look at the situation too logically.
Just because you're being shot at and it can result in death does not mean civilian counterparts don't go through something just as intense. I deal with people on a daily basis who I have no idea if they are carrying a gun, in the battlefield you know pretty much who your enemy is shooting at you, but joe shmoe down the block could be anyone I deal with on a daily basis. Some of the sites I work at, I can't have my duty weapon, luckily enough I'm confident enough in my training to be able to handle myself if a situation cannot be de-escilated or avoided.

Basically my weigh-in is this, yes military may have a much higher rate, but that's because it's believe to be a norm that feeds into itself unfortunately. Kind of what you'd call a self-fulfilling prophecy.
(0)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close