Posted on Aug 27, 2015
MSG Jan Glock
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SGT Kristin Wiley
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I think having an NCO write their own NCOER is a leadership failure. How are we supposed to trust leaders who can't even keep track of the accomplishments and performance of their direct subordinates?
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MSG Jan Glock
MSG Jan Glock
>1 y
Thank you SGT Wiley. As an E-5, I had excellent leaders who actually knew me and evaluated me on my NCOERs, and used them as a mentoring tool. As an E-6 and above, not so much. I had very little input on NCOERs other than critiquing and correcting wording or grammar, sometimes only a bullet or two. Not complaining, just stating a fact.
One of my mentors said that "who knows me better than myself"? I thought it was a cop-out at the time.
Personally, I think that my subordinates deserve a fair and just evaluation by me as their leader and as a mentor. Why else are they so important in the civilian world as well?
Let me know what you think.
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1SG Hhc First Sergeant
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I’ve had six Platoon Leaders as a Platoon Sergeant and now five different Commanders as a First Sergeant. Honestly, it depends on the situation. At the end of the day, someone must write the evaluation. If we have a rater unwilling/unable to write our report card, we must use it as a teaching mechanism.

The truth is many Officers (and NCOs) are not skilled at writing NCOERs nor are they versed in the SGM/CSM-isms that usually must be adhered to (different topic/gripe for a separate day). As NCOs are responsible for the training of individuals, crews, and small teams, we owe it to our Officer counterparts to mentor and develop them. I wrote NCOERs for myself, provided shells/examples bullets to help guide and shape the conversation, also I have done nothing and had the evaluation written for me. In my experience, those who counseled me regularly were good at writing the evaluation.

I have found it effective to help coach those poor counselors/raters along by sitting down with them and pointing them in the right direction using the following technique: Personally I like to reference previous counseling (unless that leader failed to counsel), and type out my thoughts in a MS Word document – full sentence, paragraphs, two-word thoughts, however. Once I have all my thoughts on paper, I work to quantify each thought. From there I begin to turn my thoughts into bullet format ensuring formatting is correct. Then I will crack open a few previous years’ worth of post-board AARs and ensure I’m keeping pace with ever-changing standards/best practices. Then we copy/paste the bullets onto the form, starting with the strongest bullets first.
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SSG Robert Webster
SSG Robert Webster
>1 y
1SG (Join to see) - I am glad to see that in some units in the 82nd continue to do what they have been doing for a number of years. This is in alignment with what I experienced when I was in the 82nd twenty to thirty years ago.
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MSG Jan Glock
MSG Jan Glock
>1 y
I spent nearly 10 years in the 82nd and judged all other assignments by that yardstick! I found most others wanting, except 1/9 INF and the 1/506th INF on the DMZ in Korea. Those were my three hardest, yet most rewarding assignments.
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SSG Robert Webster
SSG Robert Webster
>1 y
MSG Jan Glock - I also did a tour in Korea with the JSA at Camp Bonifas. I started my service in the 82nd in 1976 and retired from the service in the 82nd in 1996. I was lucky enough that all of my assignments were hard and rewarding during my 20 years of service.
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MSG Jan Glock
MSG Jan Glock
>1 y
I feel the same way SSG Webster...hard, but rewarding!
American Overseas Historical Society, I'd like to know more about that! It must be a very interesting place to work! We're connected on both LinkedIn and Rally Point, we should chat sometime. Thanks again!
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CPT Battery Commander
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I wrote my own NCOERs when I was enlisted. I can rate myself better than anyone else can. Plus I never trusted anyone else with my career. I also think my raters appreciated it because I was a better writer than they were. Maybe I just like to be in control because I never allow those who I rate to write their own. I can rate them better and give them the rating they deserve.
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