Posted on Jan 17, 2018
Shannon Arroyo
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SFC Observer   Controller/Trainer (Oc/T)
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No longer acceptable to knife hand people.
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COL Preventive Medicine Officer
COL (Join to see)
4 y
Couldn't stop laughing after reading your post.
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PO1 Chad Alcock
PO1 Chad Alcock
4 y
Sometimes a throat punch would be appropriate.
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MSG Louis Alexander
MSG Louis Alexander
4 y
Know how you feel Tom, when I look at people I imagine my form of attack, do I go for a throat punch or rip out an eyeball...the options are endless
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Capt Karlos Nordinsifeller
Capt Karlos Nordinsifeller
4 y
I gotta agree with the SSGT.
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CPO Robert (Mac) McGovern
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For me, it was having to decide what I was going to wear to work.
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CPO Robert (Mac) McGovern
CPO Robert (Mac) McGovern
4 y
Captain, I think, for most of us, this was a major transitional concern.
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PO1 Yeoman
PO1 (Join to see)
4 y
I've actually adopted the style of owning 5 of the same shirt and 5 pairs of the same pants. the only thing i switch up is the shoes.
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Shannon Arroyo
Shannon Arroyo
4 y
That is very interesting... that would be the last thing I would've ever thought. Thank you for sharing!
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Maj Robert Thornton
Maj Robert Thornton
4 y
I just found this CPO McGovern, it was the hardest for me as well. In the Air Force I wore Blues Mon-Thur, Friday's the BDU's. Once at work into PJ's (scrubs). Once I retired I actually had to think of what to wear, what went with what, etc.
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SGT Joseph Gunderson
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Definitely the people. There is a certain level of professionalism and work ethic that one becomes accustomed to in the military that just doesn't quite exist in the civilian world. In addition, although there may be repercussions for doing so, in the military one is able to voice opinions and different ways of doing things. Even a private can have an opinion on how to do something and, as long as it was voiced in the appropriate manner, the worst that will happen is your opinion is ignored. In the civilian world, your job is on the line if your personality doesn't jive with that of your superiors. It is interesting to think that you had far more freedom to exercise your ability to think and make a difference in how things are done in the military than you were on the outside. Many people don't think about it that way.
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Shannon Arroyo
Shannon Arroyo
4 y
Though I have never served, you are 100% right with your statement. I hear about the repercussions in corporate America quite often from candidates and applicants that I speak with.
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MSG Louis Alexander
MSG Louis Alexander
4 y
Ever think why that is Joe? Civilian’s and yes, it includes your boss feels intimidated by your persona and professionalism. They envy your service and accomplishments but you know what claws at them the most? It’s the close comradery shared by veterans. They have never or will they ever experience that Brotherhood. It’s something unique within the military, something that can’t be copied, but earned. I came across employers who were critical of veterans they say they can’t be controlled. When questioned in what form they wish to control these veterans the only answer they give is that they’ll over bearing and too damn suggestive. I ask them if they would rather hire your common, every day worker off the street who has no dedication other to themselves and lack the drive to follow through with things unlike the veteran who is highly dependable, trustworthy and more then capable of working alone, and the answer is always the same: They’d hire the veteran but it leaves a bad taste in their mouths. Now why is this? It’s the socialistic liberal mindset many employers have of veterans. My advice to you Joe, is be the man you know you are. Retain your morals, pride and ambition. Don’t settle for anything less. Be patient, eventually the world will begin opening doors to your expertise and ambitions. Seek and you will find. It’s a mind game.
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Christie S.
Christie S.
4 y
I missed common sense and decency....
When you lived in base housing, you had a certain standard and expectation. God help you if you got called before the 1st Sgt. for not mowing your grass. Even as an officer he could still ream your ass (respectfully of course). But after getting out and going to work as an HOA property manager, the lengths you have to go to just to get someone to mow their grass (5 different letters over a 3 week period). And then when you finally, as a last resort, fine them... They show up at the office being extremely rude and threatening to my staff (usually a bunch of very young girls) and once even having a small weapon pulled on me, which just pissed me off. Took the ass by surprise and disarmed him then restrained him with an extension cord till the police showed up. But come on folks, how f'ing hard is it to mow your damn grass. You signed the HOA docs when you bought the house. Its not my fault you didn't read them. I really missed adults being adults, using common sense and not whiney little kids throwing temper tantrums. I did property management for 10 years and then finally had enough and quit. that was 8 years ago, I have since, gone back to school, started my own business using my military standards as a guide line and now have 7 very productive employees and a much happier life.
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