Posted on Jun 25, 2021
CPT Infantry Officer
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This SPC calls me "hey man" outside work. I don't work with him directly; just happened to come across couple of times at work, and he did call me "sir". Not sure whether I should even bother to correct this SPC.
Posted in these groups: Customs and courtesies logo Customs and Courtesies
Edited 3 y ago
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SFC Casey O'Mally
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Edited 3 y ago
One of the wisest things I was taught as an NCO.
If you ignore a failure to meet the standard, you have just set the new standard.
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SFC Casey O'Mally
SFC Casey O'Mally
3 mo
SSG David Milholen In the situation described that would be complicating a simple matter. A quick on the spot correction solves it.

Now, if the behavior continues, or if the Soldier in question cops an attitude when being corrected, THEN you involve the chain.
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CPT Larry Hudson
CPT Larry Hudson
3 mo
If an E-4 can address an officer as "hey man" and not be repremanded for it, then Milley/Austin won the new woke military agenda. A military must, I say again, must have discipline and respect for rank. An officer can respect an E-4 as a human being by efficiency reports; rank and as individuals without being a good ole boy doing so. Humans are human but the military is a different animal. Orders can be disobeyed with the "hey man" attitude by questioning an officers orders which are lawful. To do otherwise is to invite pepremands; punishments; reduction in grade.
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CWO2 Wendell Fant, MBA
CWO2 Wendell Fant, MBA
1 mo
While I appreciate your perspective, I believe it's crucial to maintain standards and consistency, especially in leadership roles. The incident with the young E-4 presents a teachable moment rather than a cause for condemnation. It's possible they haven't been adequately informed about appropriate communication in professional settings.

Regarding your mention of the "new woke military agenda," I believe the term "woke" embodies an aspiration for greater awareness and understanding, rather than being inherently political or divisive. As leaders, our goal should be to foster a smarter, more inclusive environment that encourages growth and collaboration. Surrounding ourselves with individuals who challenge and sharpen us is essential for personal and organizational development.

As an officer in the Marine Corps, it's disappointing seeing an Army officer personal views being expressed publicly. Strong leaders prioritize the well-being and development of their team above personal opinions. Our servicemen and women deserve leaders who provide wise counsel without imposing personal beliefs. Imagine if your own children were under the guidance of someone whose values clashed with yours; it's a situation none of us would desire.

True leadership transcends politics. It's about guiding and inspiring others to achieve their best, regardless of differences in opinion. Let's focus on leading by example and creating an environment where everyone feels valued and supported, irrespective of their ideological leanings. That's the mark of a real leader.
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SSgt Forensic Meteorological Consultant
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14 d
facts!!
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Not sure what to do?! Is this even a real question? Did you miss class the day they taught leadership at OCS?
CMDCM John F. "Doc" Bradshaw
CMDCM John F. "Doc" Bradshaw
>1 y
SFC Casey O'Mally Absolutely Agree!!! Doc
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SGM Retention and Transition NCO (USAR)
SGM (Join to see)
>1 y
What is your teaching point here, sir?
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SCPO Glen Dutcher
SCPO Glen Dutcher
>1 y
This isn't a leadership issue. This is basic stuff. Correct the Specialist without causing a scene or being a dick. Most often a quiet reminder is all it really takes
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CW4 Todd McElmurry
CW4 Todd McElmurry
>1 y
SSG William Hommel - ohhh buddy... same as you.... I don't have the credit to VOTE YOURS down either... and btw..... "Feelings"? your own comment.... really?
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CPT Staff Officer
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I don't like being put in this spot. It forces me to be the bad guy, but you are doing him a favor lighting him up verses a COL (or even his company CO, or 1SG).

The most aggressive thing I've done so far was (when a 1LT) me and another LT were walking from place to place and passed a SPC that belonged to another unit. Anyway....... he didn't acknowledge us and we were within arms length. I stood him dead in his tracks, didn't point out his discrepancy and waited for him to figure it out.

On the other side of that, I had my BC mention to me someone wearing our patch not salute him when he went through the gate. Luckily it could have been from another company, but still, it applied to a subordinate in his command be it my soldier or not.

*******
Favorite story about this sutff:
I'm USAR, we went to S Korea for an exercise and the active COL/CSM met with my incoming party to brief us (basically berate us to not step out of line while in country). Then a SGT in the audience giggled at something serious the CSM was talking about, and the CSM asked him what was so funny.

The SGT replied, and I quote, "I'm laughing at what you said man".

So I'm a 2LT (3 month TIG at this point) sitting in the audience of reservists, and prior NCO, and first thing I think is "oh god damn it, this whole brief now is going to take the whole afternoon".

Yep........... that SGT got lit the F up in an auditorium in front of all his friends by a CSM flanked by the CSM's COL (highest ranking person in the room).

********
So, remember, lighting up someone now while you are an LT could possibly save them from the story above.
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SSG Matthew Fox
SSG Matthew Fox
7 mo
I concur. As I said earlier, if this would have happened back in the day when I was in, an Article 15 would have been served up immediately. I can’t believe these people think they can get away with disrespecting senior ranks.
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PO3 Pamala McBrayer
PO3 Pamala McBrayer
7 mo
I had my say at a base briefing. I stood up after being called upon to ask my question. The speaker was the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy. I THANKED HIM FOR CALLING ON ME FIRST. Then said, MASTER CHIEF ___, I understand what you are saying about fairness issues and sea shore rotations aligning between male and female sailors. I understand what the goal is. But gender based manning goals is a double edged sword. Not all these perceived advantages in favor of women are without disadvantages also. I gave my example, it was specific, and I was the aggrieved individual. Heads whipped around. I answered a couple of questions about my position/issue, and I stated in conclusion that life isn’t always fair and that I accepted that, but that I just wanted to share that there are unintended consequences that leaders needed to be aware of, that were detrimental to retention and readiness, in addition to fairness to personnel.
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MAJ Karen Wall
MAJ Karen Wall
6 mo
There is never a bad time to teach manners. Even if the other person, rank regardless, was my superior, manners are manners.
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A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
1 mo
MAJ Karen Wall -
Every So Often I Look As Some SOB, And Say To Myself:
"DAMN, I Sure Wish He'd Choke To Death......
while both of my hands are still grabbing his throat"
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