Posted on Jun 25, 2021
CPT Infantry Officer
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This SPC calls me "hey man" outside work. I don't work with him directly; just happened to come across couple of times at work, and he did call me "sir". Not sure whether I should even bother to correct this SPC.
Edited 1 y ago
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SFC Casey O'Mally
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Edited 1 y ago
One of the wisest things I was taught as an NCO.
If you ignore a failure to meet the standard, you have just set the new standard.
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SN Dale "CG" Veach
SN Dale "CG" Veach
4 mo
An officer is an officer...period.
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MAJ Public Affairs Officer
MAJ (Join to see)
3 mo
SN Dale "CG" Veach - That means two things.
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SSgt David M.
SSgt David M.
2 mo
I ETS'd in June 1981. It was not because I hated my job or the US Army but it was due to the way Promotions were being done at the time. We had a CWO 1 as our Motor Officer and he failed everyone in our Motor Pool based on his perception of what we were required to do but due to his failure to lead us and obtaining a sub-standard OER he played it down to those of us that did the grunt work. Failure to take responsibility goes all the way to the top because it is your responsibility to make sure that those you are in charge of are at all times squared away and up to par. All my EERs from 1973 to 1979 were 124 or 125. I was on the Promotion standing list for E-6 with a score of 680. The cut off at the time was 681. I watched other E-5s get promoted with GT scores of 85 and lower, but they were moved to other Companies withing the 31st Infantry as only the ranking person in HHC could be in charge as the BN Motor Sergeant. When I was with in 90 days I was called into the Company Commander's Office to find out why I had not reenlisted? I explained the problems were with the BN Motor Officer and the failure of him to communicate any issues he had with the operations of the BN Motor Pool as well as the lack of promotions. My gut feeling at the time was I was being passed over due to a Permanent P-3 profile due to a leg injury which occurred during duty a year earlier in Germany. The question was asked during the promotion board for the details of the injury and no additional questions or comments were presented. I had a clean record and when I ETS'd the comment was made that they had not seen such a clean record of anyone that they had processed, no Article 15s, no disciplinary actions, or any negative EER's except for the one unsigned one for 1979. I had planned to stay in the US Army but for the actions of those over me at the time, left me with a bad taste in my mouth! I had decided to go the Reserve route but could not locate any US Army Reserve units with an E-5 slot that I could jump into, so I tried the USAFR and spent the next two years as an active duty reservist. A back injury on one of the Reserve Drills put an end to that thought! Just as well as I needed a break and decided it was time to move on with my life and future! ;-) I SALUTE All My Fellow Veterans!!!
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SSG William Hommel
SSG William Hommel
2 mo
I did 11 active late 70s trough 80s, then tried reserves twice. I was a lifer except I thought I was going to get rich with my computer talents. LOL about that, but the difference between regular army and reserves was day and night back then. Maybe all the sand box wars changed that difference, but I could not stand it. I was an E6 nearly (P) when I ETS, and the first reserve CO tried to bring me in as an E4. (???) I said no and did good work for him.. helped get him a good eval on a major annual exercise, but I got no reward of any kind. I guess lesson learned is that standards are not the same everywhere regardless if the standards purportedly come from the same higher HQ a mile high above.
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Maj Logistics Officer
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Not sure what to do?! Is this even a real question? Did you miss class the day they taught leadership at OCS?
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PO1 Steven Siepp
PO1 Steven Siepp
3 mo
I've known a number of mustangs throughout my career and became friends with them off duty. I always addressed them as sir or mam unless they corrected me. My LT became a good friend an he and I were on a first name basis unless in uniform or is he was with another officer
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PV2 Timothy Crater
PV2 Timothy Crater
3 mo
hey man does not cut it, unless you are outside military duty and have the persons permission. That being said, I always address people i do not know as sir or mam as it is a sign of respect to that person, unless or until I have a proper name for them or they prefer something else. Respect is one of the things that are sadly missing in this world as a whole these days. everyone would be a lot better off if there were some respect shown to everybody everywhere>
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SSgt David M.
SSgt David M.
2 mo
I think that most that are responding are doing a lot of assuming here. If any Officer is in Uniform on Base or off and the EM is in Uniform, A salute and 'Sir' or 'Mam'. If the Officer is in uniform and the EM is not then a Salute is not required and the 'Sir' or 'Mam' is also not required. If the EM recognizes the Officer the Term 'Sir' or 'Mam' should be given out of respect. There is no requirement to recognize an Officer based on the lack of a uniform. More details should be provided as to where this occurred on base or off? ;-) I SALUTE All My Fellow Veterans!!!
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SSG William Hommel
SSG William Hommel
2 mo
I can't vote this down because I don't have credit lmao. Having been USMC, you can't do better than that? Completely unhelpful. I once wished I'd gone USMC instead of Army. Comments like yours assuage my feelings about that.
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CPT Staff Officer
103
103
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I don't like being put in this spot. It forces me to be the bad guy, but you are doing him a favor lighting him up verses a COL (or even his company CO, or 1SG).

The most aggressive thing I've done so far was (when a 1LT) me and another LT were walking from place to place and passed a SPC that belonged to another unit. Anyway....... he didn't acknowledge us and we were within arms length. I stood him dead in his tracks, didn't point out his discrepancy and waited for him to figure it out.

On the other side of that, I had my BC mention to me someone wearing our patch not salute him when he went through the gate. Luckily it could have been from another company, but still, it applied to a subordinate in his command be it my soldier or not.

*******
Favorite story about this sutff:
I'm USAR, we went to S Korea for an exercise and the active COL/CSM met with my incoming party to brief us (basically berate us to not step out of line while in country). Then a SGT in the audience giggled at something serious the CSM was talking about, and the CSM asked him what was so funny.

The SGT replied, and I quote, "I'm laughing at what you said man".

So I'm a 2LT (3 month TIG at this point) sitting in the audience of reservists, and prior NCO, and first thing I think is "oh god damn it, this whole brief now is going to take the whole afternoon".

Yep........... that SGT got lit the F up in an auditorium in front of all his friends by a CSM flanked by the CSM's COL (highest ranking person in the room).

********
So, remember, lighting up someone now while you are an LT could possibly save them from the story above.
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Cpl Jason Lang
Cpl Jason Lang
3 mo
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney - LMAO!!!! That was a good one!!! Too bad the professor had no sense of humor. I'm not the trouble maker though....although, I have been in trouble....more than once. I'm not the one who set off the fire suppression system. I only witnessed it because I had the 24 hour duty that night.

As requested: Funny addition to that particular story; I was sitting in the C.O's. chair in the pilots briefing room...half asleep, and half awake. The officer who had duty with me, (they get to go to sleep and even have a cot in a side room), comes out and sits at the desk at the front of the room. We hear this commotion on the other side of the sound proofed door...er...um..."hatch", and without looking up he says: "Lcpl. Lang." My half asleep answer: "Yyessir." Him: "Never mind. I'll get it." He gets up. Goes to the door/hatch and opens it and just stands there. I hear what sounds like water. He closes the door/hatch and sits back down at the desk and starts writing in the log book. Without looking up he says: "Lcpl. Lang." "Yes sir." "Go open the hatch and tell me what you see." "Aye, aye, sir." I get up. Go to the hatch and open it, and all I see is a WALL OF WATER!!! "SIR!!! I SEE WATER, SIR!!!!!" Him: "That's what I thought. Close the hatch before it gets in here." WHAM!!! So he gets on the phone and starts calling everyone in. The C.O. The X.O. The Maintenance Chief. Etc, etc, etc. After a few phone calls, he sends me home because with everyone awake and on their way in, there's no longer any reason for me to be there. As I get down stairs, (aka: the ladder well), there's the Master Gunny Sgt. w/his arms crossed across his chest and rocking back on his heels, and looking at the hangar deck. I say, "Good morning Top", and ask him what he's looking at. His answer: "I've never seen a cleaner hangar deck in my LIFE!!!!!" Turns out, the crew chief who was first in line to get his a/c tools was out on the flight line, and happened to have his camera with him, so he got a couple of pictures of this event. Because of all the water coming out of the ceiling, you can barely see the two aircraft that were in the hangar at the time. To my knowledge, command never did find out how it happened. But my friend manning the tool room said it was hysterical how Marines were suddenly scrambling through his window, and through the hatch to his work space/tool room, and the guys in the Avionics work space had similar comments...except they had a gap at the bottom of their hatch, and so water was flooding through it. Not a good thing regarding a work space full of electronic equipment.
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A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
3 mo
LMAO....
A Total Military SNAFU In The Making
And Just Funny As All "L". Too.
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MAJ Public Affairs Officer
MAJ (Join to see)
3 mo
This happened to me once, as a major in an Infantry Division Staff. I was at a Best Buy or Target or something afterhours.
BLUF: After this Soldier, who knew who I was (DIV PAO), approached me with his friends, showed his ass by saying, "Hey, man, how's it going?", I took his ID, found out who his company commander was, and had his commander report to me to get "my friend's" ID back.
We all make mistakes. Inexperienced and/or uneducated Soldiers will make more of them. It's part of a leader's charter to correct these mistakes with clarity and compassion.
We all make mistakes. Correcting these mistakes is not a waste of time.
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A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
3 mo
MAJ (Join to see) -
That's Where Ones "Leadership" Abilities Come Into Being.
Taking Care Of An Issue Quietly While Not Creating A Problem In The Process.
These Are The Manner Of Skills Which Should Be Taught Early On In Our Educational Facilities; But, Unfortunately, They're NOT.. ..Our Schools Waste 100's, If Not Thousands Of Hours And Dollars On Foolish Subject Matter When There's So Many Other Useful Programs Could Take Their Places...... Keeping In Mind, I've Witnessed I've These Events While Employed By Our Schools For Over 13 Years.....
Although The Teacher Are Mostly Great, It's The Mandatory Curriculum Is Where The True Problems Exist, Effectively Stopping The Teacher From Actually Educating Their Students..... Ask Any RETIRED Teacher, Because Should You Inquire To An Presently Employed Teacher & THEY Tell You What's Happening, The Teacher Could Easily Lose Their Jobs.. ,,..Been There, SEEN That,.
Although They Can't Actually Be Fired For Voicing Their Opinion, Their Job Description Is Followed & Tightened Up To The Point That The Teacher Has One "L"Of A Time Just TRYING To Teach; ...Then They Get Canned For Being An Incompetent Instructor. ... And It STICKS.!
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