Posted on Jun 25, 2021
CPT Infantry Officer
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This SPC calls me "hey man" outside work. I don't work with him directly; just happened to come across couple of times at work, and he did call me "sir". Not sure whether I should even bother to correct this SPC.
Edited 11 mo ago
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SFC Casey O'Mally
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Edited 11 mo ago
One of the wisest things I was taught as an NCO.
If you ignore a failure to meet the standard, you have just set the new standard.
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SGT Abdul Lopez
SGT Abdul Lopez
1 mo
SFC Casey O'Mally - Interesting analogy on your part. Yes, I did serve in a different era 1986-1992 to be exact. This means if you are an SFC (E7) at this time, means that you are the new breed and I would have retired years ago. The fact that you do not know how to separate your profession from your personal life says a lot about you. But, I am not here to go back and forth with you or anyone else for that matter. Just you talking about rank tells me where your head's at. That shows me that you look at the short-term vision and not the long-term sight. Regardless of whatever, my way of thinking and your way of thinking is exactly that. That is called being an individual and can think for himself. This is real simple. There was a question here and I gave my feedback. That makes me an individual. I am not one to be with the masses. I am my own man and I will always be a soldier, I will always be an Airborne Ranger and there is nothing that you or anyone can do to change that. It's all on my military resume aka DD214. Carry on soldier and bring that BS to someone who really cares. Regards, SGT. Lopez - 2/504 PIR (Devils with Baggy Pants) 82nd Airborne Division.
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SFC Casey O'Mally
SFC Casey O'Mally
1 mo
SGT Abdul Lopez If you served from 1986 - 1992, why is your rank listed as SP5? That rank was phased out before you joined.

And the only reason I addressed your rank is BECAUSE of when it was abolished. Were you truly a SP5, you would have served in an even earlier era than you identify here. It was a denotion of your period of service, not of the character, quality, or value of it, nor a comment on "you lowly E5, bow to the wisdom of the mighty E7."

I don't know how you come to the conclusion I can't separate personal life from profession. Unless I was on base, in the unit area, it's not like I was walking around in civvies whipping out salutes. But if you mean did I correct Soldiers out of uniform at the PX, even in civvies? Absolutely. Because it was my JOB to do so. Again... Soldier 24/7. If you believe you stopped being a Soldier the second the bugler played Retreat, then it is obvious to me that the vaunted 82nd Airborne doesn't really have as high of standards as they claim.

I have no idea what you mean about short term vision versus long term sight. Because an on-the-spot correction has much more to do with the long-term than it does the near-term. I will again utter the phrase "good order and discipline," which is absolutely ESSENTIAL for a professional Army.

I also find it curious that you claim to be an airborne ranger, yet identify yourself as a member of a PIR. Because the Ranger bats were in full existence when you joined, and ranger regiment formed either right before or right after you joined. Which means you were - at best - a ranger qualified airborne trooper, not an airborne ranger.

It is also curious that you say they are not Soldiers, but civilians when off duty, but here you say you will always be a Soldier. Which is it? Always a Soldier, or only a Soldier when in uniform and on duty?

Finally, I am retired. Just FYI.
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SGT Abdul Lopez
SGT Abdul Lopez
1 mo
SFC Casey O'Mally - Let me be clear as to why I put SPC5 on here. When I opened this account that is what it showed me and that is on me because I didn't read further. I know that the SPC5 and SPC6 were discontinued in 1985. So in that aspect I stand corrected. Also, let me be frank here. From 87-90 I served in the 75th Regiment 2nd Battalion out of Fort Lewis, Washington. This is now before it became Joint Base Lewis-McChord. On my reenlistment I wanted to go to Ft. Bragg, because that was the unit my uncle went to Vietnam with. So when I said 2\504th PIR. It stand for 2nd Battalion of the 504th Paruchute Infantry Regiment. But make no mistake about it. When you have been in Ft. Benning as long as I was to be Airborne and Ranger qualified was the best choice I ever made. The rank did not make me a man. My choice is what made me a man. So thank you for your service and that will be all. Carry on soldier. Be well and travel safe. /G\Congratulations on your retirement. Well deserved.
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SN Dale "CG" Veach
SN Dale "CG" Veach
1 mo
An officer is an officer...period.
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Maj Logistics Officer
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Not sure what to do?! Is this even a real question? Did you miss class the day they taught leadership at OCS?
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A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
1 mo
MSG (Join to see) - ....
WHEN & IF in Question,
SALUTE
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Frank Godek
Frank Godek
1 mo
PV2 Joy Phillip - I've known of officers who knew enlisted people outside of work. That is, they may have know each other as civilians before they joined the Army. An obvious example is a senior NCO who is still on active duty and has a child that is a commissioned officer. On duty, the NCO will certainly address the officer appropriately but off-duty they are still father and child. However, in the situation mentioned, there is no such special off-duty relationship. If the officer and SP4 had a mutual acquaintance and met socially, it would be up to the officer if her or she would accept be addressed casually. It is not the purview of the SP4 to make that decision. He or she should be invited to relax military courtesies and not assume that it's appropriate just because he or she is off duty.
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PO1 Steven Siepp
PO1 Steven Siepp
6 d
I've known a number of mustangs throughout my career and became friends with them off duty. I always addressed them as sir or mam unless they corrected me. My LT became a good friend an he and I were on a first name basis unless in uniform or is he was with another officer
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PV2 Timothy Crater
PV2 Timothy Crater
7 m
hey man does not cut it, unless you are outside military duty and have the persons permission. That being said, I always address people i do not know as sir or mam as it is a sign of respect to that person, unless or until I have a proper name for them or they prefer something else. Respect is one of the things that are sadly missing in this world as a whole these days. everyone would be a lot better off if there were some respect shown to everybody everywhere>
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CPT Staff Officer
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I don't like being put in this spot. It forces me to be the bad guy, but you are doing him a favor lighting him up verses a COL (or even his company CO, or 1SG).

The most aggressive thing I've done so far was (when a 1LT) me and another LT were walking from place to place and passed a SPC that belonged to another unit. Anyway....... he didn't acknowledge us and we were within arms length. I stood him dead in his tracks, didn't point out his discrepancy and waited for him to figure it out.

On the other side of that, I had my BC mention to me someone wearing our patch not salute him when he went through the gate. Luckily it could have been from another company, but still, it applied to a subordinate in his command be it my soldier or not.

*******
Favorite story about this sutff:
I'm USAR, we went to S Korea for an exercise and the active COL/CSM met with my incoming party to brief us (basically berate us to not step out of line while in country). Then a SGT in the audience giggled at something serious the CSM was talking about, and the CSM asked him what was so funny.

The SGT replied, and I quote, "I'm laughing at what you said man".

So I'm a 2LT (3 month TIG at this point) sitting in the audience of reservists, and prior NCO, and first thing I think is "oh god damn it, this whole brief now is going to take the whole afternoon".

Yep........... that SGT got lit the F up in an auditorium in front of all his friends by a CSM flanked by the CSM's COL (highest ranking person in the room).

********
So, remember, lighting up someone now while you are an LT could possibly save them from the story above.
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SP5 Ed Nolan
SP5 Ed Nolan
2 mo
PFC Eric Stosius - That's go shit in your hat SIR !!!!!!! LOL
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A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
1 mo
SP5 Ed Nolan - ....
In THAT Case ED,
FA-Q,....LOL
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A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
1 mo
...CPT (Verify To See)..?:
My First Assignment Was In Security Services And That's Where I Met My Roommate, David L. Libby, As Crazy As They Come.
We Immediately Became Friends & We'd Pull Crap, Just To Watch The Action;
One Morning At Chow, Dave Said: "Rick, I Have An Idea Which Should Be Fun Yet Keep Us, Somewhat, Out Of Trouble...
"Let's Only Salute Captains And Up. And See How Long We Can Get Away With It...
It Only Took About 3 Days When A Brand New 2 nd Lt. Around 1720 Hours,
Was Passing By & As He Passed, He Stopped, Turned Around, In Our Direction, And Asked "AIRMEN, Don't You Salute Officers"?
At Which Point, Dave Looked At The Lt;, Then His Watch & Back To The Lt. , Then Looked Him Directly In The Eyes And Asked:,,"SIR, It's Past 1700 Hours. Why Are You NOT Familiar With (B,S,) Base Regulation 85432, Paragraph 1, Lines 3 & 4; Dated July 23, 1952, Which Clearly States: "There Will No Longer Be A Requirement For The Enlisted Personnel To Salute Officers After 1700 Hours".?
At That Point, The Lt. Said: I've Only Been Here For About 3 Weeks And Wasn't Familiar With That Regulation. I'm Sorry, But I Do Know Now. Dave Said: "Sir, We Understand; Good Luck Here At Little Rock",,,And Walked Away; KNOWING If He Ever Saw Us Again, Our Asses Were Cooked ..... THE END... Thank The Gods.
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SSG Infantryman
SSG (Join to see)
1 mo
MSgt Marvin Kinderknecht did I misunderstand the first sentence where it says outside of work?
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