Posted on Jul 24, 2020
SGT Civil Affairs Specialist
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I have met many people I served with who have degrees in: interdisciplinary studies, weapons of mass destruction, counter terrorism, English, psychology from online degree mills.
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COL Commander
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I don’t think an English degree is useless. Have you even seen how some of our senior enlisted leaders write. Young officers too. So what degrees do you see as not being useless? My daughter has an electrical engineering degree and is an artillery officer. My History degree got me a one way ticket to flight school. The army thrives in diversity. We don’t put all the square pegs in the square holes.
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SN Miguel V.
SN Miguel V.
>1 y
COL (Join to see) not just the military....in my 28 years in IT I've seen the same shit even by people with PhD.'s!! The worst part is some notice it and just say, "Ah fuck it!!" As one of my former manager at my last job would say, "Perception is everything!! In your conduct, your manner of speak, your dress, and especially how you treat others." and he was right on all points!!
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SrA Michael Webster
SrA Michael Webster
2 y
An English degree, at least ones gained relatively recently. I have been working on an English degree. Most of my classes have been "social justice" courses more than English.

College campuses have become "ideological indoctrination day camps".

One example of many is an English course that fulfills the International Requirement for graduation. "Global and Transnational Literature" is a class that will focus on a specific topic. For me, this course was discussing Asian Literature. We read books from authors from Japan, China, Vietnam, India, and the Philippines. Good so far, right?

With a class such as this, you would expect some of the topics would be:
How has Asian Literature changed over the centuries?
How are the different cultures in Asia different/similar in storytelling?
How is Asian literature different from Western literature?

Seems like a fair expectation.

What I got was:
A lecture on the Male Gaze
How women lose their agency when performing at a strip club
The "virtue" of Socialism
The Evils of Capitalism
How seeing Asian cultures as "exotic" is an example of Colonialism and Orientalism.
A lecture on "toxic masculinity"

It's not just this one class.

Another class was studying Haggard's "King Solomon's Mines". The professor went on about how it was colonialism and latent homosexuality, but when the man characters are at a cave where they are told a cache of raw diamonds is, the professor stated, "according to Feminist Theory, this is an example of the Masculine penetrating the Feminine. I argued that "according to Dungeon Master Theory, have a treasure inside a cave is more exciting than finding the treasure in a sunlit field of dandelions.

My German textbook, and was also discussed in class, was that the concept we have of family (i.e., caring for our children) is a recent invention. Also, the family is actually based on house slavery.

I took a writing class called "Writing About War". I should have known from the start it wouldn't be about "writing about war". The professor had to get keys for the classroom and when he opened the door he said "light it up". I snickered and he didn't know why I found it funny. In a class such of this I would expect to explore topics such as how to write war as a background, setting, or even a a character. Nope. We explored topics on sexual assault in the military, PTSD, and how the VA has betrayed and abandoned veterans. These are indeed very important topics to discuss, but not these are in a broader subject dealing with the military over all, and not about war.
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SSG Lobsang Salaka
SSG Lobsang Salaka
2 y
Does not matter what degree, it is useful. In military, you may think not useful, particularly, it important in civilian career,
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MAJ Karl Swenson
MAJ Karl Swenson
2 y
I have to tell you, I'm of the mind that a college degree doesn't teach us as much about a particular subject as it teaches us how to research and critically think. I was commissioned as a result of OCS with only one semester of college completed at that point. For the next few years I attempted to get a degree but I was never in one place long enough to fulfill a university's residency requirement. I had courses completed at 9 different colleges and universities, none of which matched a degree program. I asked the folks at Infantry Branch in what area I should be getting my degree. I distinctly remember the answer, "We don't care, as long as it is from a university." Not a great deal of advice...
When I left active duty, I enrolled in a large midwestern university, talked with an advisor, showed that advisor my earned credits, and watched him lay one after another aside while telling me that those credits would not fit my degree program.
The point of this comment is that a degree is well worth the effort. Certainly, we learn skills that are necessary. But above all, we learn to think critically, determine outcomes, and plan for the future. If you're looking to get a degree, make sure that you have the advice of a professional at a university who can provide guidance in what courses to take, and when.
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CSM Darieus ZaGara
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Worthless degree Vs. degree that one does not use! Pretty much the same. Bottom line is the soft skills that are attained. The ability to research, evaluate, assess, write, time management, creative thinking, networking etc.

I do not care to look for a study, I would venture to bet the vast majority of persons who hold degrees do not work in that field.
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Maj John Bell
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For the same reason so many civilians have useless degrees.

They go to college with no idea of what they want to do in life, and they've never had to bust their hump in a hardworking skilled trades job, or done factory work. Then someone tells them that a degree in Romance Languages, or Philosophy, or Art Appreciation is their ticket (for maybe 1% in those studies.)

Best thing my Dad ever did for his two boys. At age 14 we had to start paying room and board, buy our own cloths, school supplies, and entertainment. I never drove a car that belonged to Dad, and Dad did not pay my auto insurance.

Back then there weren't many jobs in Tucson for healthy juvenile boys during the summer, that weren't essentially "sweating your ass off in the red hot Arizona sun. By the time I was 18, I already had a skilled trades job, and growing side business of my own, with 3 part-time employees, that would have provided a respectable blue collar lifestyle for me, a wife and a couple of kids." Fortunately, I didn't have the wife or the kids yet. But I knew I wanted more than the red hot Arizona sun.

PS Dad invested the money, and gave it to us on our 18th birthday. Then, he gave us notice that we had one week to move out after HS graduation.
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