Posted on Jan 31, 2016
MAJ Public Affairs Specialist
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I had an E-5 ask me about the maturity level of the Army Reserves and why the maturity level is less then he expected it would be. I explained that I believe it is due to a lack of mentorship and development. Leaders do not seem to be counseling or mentoring like they should and the subordinates are not seeking out the mentorship needed resulting in leaders that need more professional development
Posted in these groups: Reserves_logo ReservesUnited_states_ar_seal.svg Army ReserveGetakwwcoach Mentorship
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Responses: 30
COL Jon Thompson
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As a retired Army Reserve officer, it does hurt me to say this but in my experience, it is a thing of the past. I think a lot of this is due to a limited amount of training time and when it comes to doing something that is used as a metric for a Commander's OER vs. something that you cannot measure (mentorship) as easily, the measurable thing will win out. Those are what you can put on an OER and that is how many of the units in which served were measured. I spent many drill weekends focused on the latest mandatory training and not even on our battle tasks much less mentoring. That does not mean it is like that for every unit but when a Commander has to prioritize something, it will be what makes the unit look good on a slide. IMHO.
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SSG Environmental Specialist
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I agree sir. I was a UA for the reserves for a stint, higher command is now concerned about metrics so all the training and stuff we did back in the 90's is out because we spend all our time completing surveys and online classes to get metrics into the green. Unit readiness and soldier readiness do not fit into the metrics..
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COL Jon Thompson
COL Jon Thompson
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SSG (Join to see) - My last unit was in the 75th Training Command and we were supposed to be experts on the Operations process, MDMP, etc. There was a core of us who knew that but many of them (mostly field grade officers and senior NCOs) were far from SMEs. Yet instead of focusing on that, it was just as you said. Doing all of the mandatory training requirements to make sure our commander did not look bad. I was so glad to leave that unit and deploy to Afghanistan where at least I felt I was making a contribution.
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SSG Environmental Specialist
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I joined a small Liaison team, it was not as bad, we could knock out all the computer stuff and still have time for training etc. but these larger units do not have the assets such as computers etc to allow soldiers to knock all that mandatory stuff out.
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MAJ Fuops Planner
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We as leaders need to bring it back. I keep hearing CSMs saying back to the basics but I rarely see it in action when it comes to mentoring, but only in some silliness that people do when they have no real job to do.
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MSG Mark Rudolph
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Great topic of discussion. I don't think it's necessarily due to a lack of counseling. I believe it's a lack of taking an interest in the professional growth of subordinates. As most leaders are aware, the Reserve environment doesn't offer much time to do everything that is required. It never fails, that no matter how stacked your training schedule is, higher HQ always places additional tasks that need to get done during Battle Assembly. Counseling and mentoring doesn't need to be "formal". I find the time. It may be during lunch, in the middle of the day if I catch one of my Soldiers enroute to other training, or after-hours having a beer or two. Obviously, I'm "old school", but it works. You have to think outside the box and get it done.
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COL Mike Humphrey
COL Mike Humphrey
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Its great to see some "old school" NCO's that actually care about their soldiers. We need more NCO's and Officers to do the same as you.
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MSG Chief Instructor
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COL Mike Humphrey - Sir, unfortunately, we "old school" NCOs are now a rare breed, and most of these kids coming in.....they'll never get it and just don't care. I went back to my company that I was the 1SG to visit after being gone just 3 years and it was a shamble of what I had it looking like and performing like. They just don't understand. Also, It's the Army's fault for taking the time away from the NCOs to mentor the Soldiers. Damn, I miss the good old days. LOL
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MSG Mechanic 2nd
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1sg could nt agree more, 31 years retired, wish i could have stayed more but could no longer take the atitude of these new army soldiers
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