Posted on Jan 14, 2014
SGT Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
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I have just started riding again after 10 years, I used to ride dirt bikes. I have heard from many Motorcycle rider, experience and inexperienced, that there are two kinds of riders, those who have dropped their bikes and those who have not yet dropped their bike. I don't know if it is a Army wide policy or just a Fort Hood policy, but if you drop your bike for any reason (even if you drop it pushing it into your garage in your own driveway), you get grounded for three months or more before they will make a decision on what to do and then you have to go through the BRC again. I asked a friend of mine, a Marine what their policy is, I was told there really is no policy, just follow the rules of the state you are in. So what is your opinion the policy is? Are other Army Bases this strict, or is it just Fort Hood?
A post has been put out, and I question the same. If a motorcyclist must retake the BRC if they get into an accident, should it be the same for someone driving a car to take drivers training, weather it be their fault or not?
Update

I realize I may not have been clear in my post, I did not post exactly what happened because I did not feel was relavent and I wanted it to be short and to the point. I just wanted to get the basic how do you feel about policies. With some comments that have been made, Im thinking I should have just posted what happened.

So I am not at Hood anymore, when this incident happend, I was about 2 or 3 months from PCS. When I spoke on dropping it in your garage, it was just for example of a possible incident to get grounded for. I just started riding again, purchased a used bike, and still getting used to the controls. I was in a half empty parking lot at lunch, no cars driving around, I was driving about 2mph, I started to turn one way and decided I didn't want to go that way, stalled the bike; since I was in a slight lean, it cause my bike to drop (first and only time since I started riding again). No property damage, the bike was not damaged, I was not injured. I was honest with my mentor about what happend, though nobody saw that I know of, he had to report it. An investigation was opened up, I was denied to see the BG CDR to state my case. I even have an email where my BN CDR said I can start riding again, and then he took it back. I was enrolled in the BRC at Hood, and someone kept cancelling my reservation. At this time I have been in about 10 years, I have never been to IG, and they wouldn't help me out. The rumor, what I hear from who I feel is a very reliable sources, is that the commanding III Corps General (during this time period) hates motorcycles and has made strict policy because so, and if one of the prior 3 Generals (who were motorcyle enthusiasts) were still in command, this very likely would be pretty much a life lesson. I think that clears things up a bit, I appologize for any misunderstanding.
Edited 5 y ago
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Responses: 18
1SG Steven Stankovich
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SPC(P) Bailey - Leave it to the US Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center to have all the answers to your questions. I suggest that you take a look at the page and see what you can find out there. Along with that, you should research through your unit Safety Officer what the "additional" safety measures that have been directed by your unit/installation. Good luck riding!!!




https://safety.army.mil/mmp/

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SGM Operations Sergeant
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6 y
I agree the army safety center is a very good place to start to get answers for your questions you might have. remember commanders can make the requirements harder but can not relax the standard any more then stated originally. Also the army wide requirement to have a basic rider safety course is a good thing. I grew up on dirt bikes on the ranch and once old enough bought my first street bike . There is a difference so this helps bridge the gap so to speak.
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1LT Executive Officer
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Every commander can make their own rules. Most installations have a "motorcycle mentorship program" policy letter or something similar. A lot of brigades, some battalions, and very few company sized elements have their own policy letters that are more stringent than the post policy.

Check with the motorcycle mentor in your unit (usually someone that does the TCLOCS inspection) to get all the resources.

Now, if that (about dropping the bike) is true, then I am going to openly support command decision and quietly shake my head.
Fort Lee is relatively reasonable on their motorcycle safety policy. My unit has its own and more strict policy. One of the elements is a full body picture of the rider wearing all PPE alongside with a counseling, a memorandum, copies of all documentation, within (more stringent) dates for BRC, etc. I tell the students to just leave their bikes at their respective duty stations.
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SSG General Services Technician And State Vehicle Inspector
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6 y

Most units do have a mentorship program to include the full body picture. I'm working on that now with my unit.

I disagree with many things within DOD regarding motorcycles but the one that SPC Bailey mentioned about dropping the bike is ridiculous. Things happen. No rider is perfect but we do make every effort to stay as safe as possible. To put it in perspective, if we were to apply the same rules to automibles then many people would be fully retaking the driver's tests just because they are in an accident, whether their fault or not. What about if a vehicle gets damaged because of some type of weather (i.e. hail)? Retake driver's tests?

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SGT Healthcare Specialist (Combat Medic)
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5 y
I agree with you, if a motrcycle rider must retake the BRC for any kind of accident on their bike, then it should be the same in a care or truck. Their was this girl in my unit who got into a few accidents, I don't think they ever did anything about it.
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SSG Paul Ellis
SSG Paul Ellis
>1 y
I got a speeding ticket on Ft. Hood (on one of those back roads with nobody around except the MP who was hiding out of sight) and to remove it from my record, I had to take a 1 day class on West Ft. Hood where we drove car simulators. There were motorcycle simulators there also.

That seems like a common sense idea to retrain after car and motorcycle accidents. Let's be honest. It's more CA for the chain of command than anything else.
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LTC Program Manager
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Edited 6 y ago
As with most Army policies and all zero tolerance policies this ignores leaders and the situation the Soldier was in and the decisions the Soldier made. You can do everything right and still have an accident. My guess is the CG does not have a bike.
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Maj Chris Nelson
Maj Chris Nelson
6 y
I find that MANY people making decissions for others do NOT have a vested interest, or any real deapth of knowledge on the subject they are making the decissions on....whether it be motorcycles or firearms, or a myrid of other things. and I abhor zero tolerance policies.....
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