Posted on Oct 17, 2018
SGT UH-60 Helicopter Repairer
11.5K
100
31
20
20
0
I use rally point for a lot of questions I have in the military, I find it very Informative. The only reason I made an account on here tho is to get some opinions on my particular situation just like every one else. I have delt with depression and anxiety for a little bit over a year now. Very few people know about this so posting it on here is a big deal for me. I get little to no sleep at night. Sometimes depression hits and it’s smothering, to the point I’ll hit my bed and feel like I can’t move for hours. I’m not talking about watching Netflix or playing on my phone either. I get in a very heavy populated area like Walmart or any other place sometimes I start “freaking out” in my head of course I wouldn’t pop off on any one I know it’s just in my head. There are more symptoms but for the sake of reading this long post I’ll get on with it. I have ignored it for over a year but I’ve finally come to terms I need to be looked at. It’s a very poor time to do though because I just got to my new unit I know I should have solved it before I PCS’d but it’s to late to worry about that. They are putting me in a flight company, that’s where I have spent my entire military career. I’m thinking I need to request a maintenance company because they have more steady hours and start being seen. I just don’t want to be a strain on my unit or disappoint my higher up. Any advice is greatly appreciated
Avatar_feed
Responses: 28
MAJ Ken Landgren
21
21
0
Edited 1 y ago
You are fighting a culture where we are taught to never quit and persevere. In my opinion you have suffered long and hard enough to ask for help. Your mental and physical health are paramount to you. Take that leap and get help. Dispel any thought that you are at fault, shit happens in life.
(21)
Comment
(0)
MAJ Ken Landgren
MAJ Ken Landgren
7 mo
I see a therapist and get meds. When I am depressed sometimes I numb myself or think of happier memories. When it comes to anxiety, I try to prioritize them. Kind of like going to the range, you shoot the closest first then shoot further targets. That way it does not hit me all at one time.
(5)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
SGT Elizabeth S.
14
14
0
Like SFC (Join to see) said, huge kudos! Before I decided to go seek professional help, I fought it for years. I was kinda in denial, I didn't think anything was wrong with me. Honestly, getting help was the best thing I've ever done. It wasn't until I got help that I found out I have a severe chemical imbalance, which causes my generalized anxiety disorder. Along with some serious traumatic events that happened in my younger years, in my therapists words, it was a recipe for disaster. Now that I've gotten the help that was necessary, I've never felt better, and have realized how many people are actually struggling with these types of issues. You're not alone, there are so many people who are willing to talk, who more than likely know what you're going through, and want to be here for you. :)
(14)
Comment
(0)
SP5 John LaRocque
SP5 John LaRocque
6 mo
I have fought it successfully for years. Got harder after retirement. You might want to explore Kratom while it is still legal. Don’t mix it with anything.
(1)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
SGT Aircraft Mechanic
14
14
0
I've spent most of my aviation career in a flight company. Flying has been one of the few things that I've been able to use to keep myself out of getting into those depressive or anxious ruts. My head could have me being a complete slug on a given day and then it's time to load up and fly and I get a rocket in my backside. It gives me something to focus on other than the things swirling around in my brain. You've got 2 or 3 other people and a multimillion dollar aircraft that you're responsible for, so there's no time to listen to whatever nonsense your brain is trying to trick you into thinking about.

I got moved to a maintenance company in February because the flight company I was in was deploying but I had a temporary profile so I couldn't go. My first couple months there were horrible because all I could think about was that I had let my other company down and I had lost the one thing that I could say with 100% certainty I enjoyed doing and kept me centered. It took me a couple months to realize that I was an important part of the equation where I had ended up. There were only a couple of us NCOs that the guys had anything remotely resembling trust in. When I saw that, I had to flip a switch. Someone had to lead and take care of those juniors.

You need to do what's best for you in the end. Regardless of which way you decide to go, bear in mind that you're going to have responsibilities. Don't worry about letting the people above you down. Worry about the people below you. If you do that, the people above you will see that and take note.

Also, decide what being a crew chief means to you. A lot of medications will get you grounded, sometimes permanently depending on what they are. DO NOT let that deter you from at least talking to someone if you feel like you need to. Sometimes just talking to a counselor or something can do a world of good.
(14)
Comment
(0)
Avatar_small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close
Seg?add=7750261&t=2