Avatar feed
Responses: 6
Capt Lance Gallardo
5
5
0
SP5 Mark Kuzinski The Ribbon Creek Incident, at Perris Island Recruit Depot in 1956, where a Marine Drill Instructor (DI) killed six of his recruits, is burned into the consciousness of every Marine DI, their Series Commander (the Officer, usually a First Lieutenant, who immediately oversees/Supervises and is there to Keep a Watrchful Eye on the Drill Instructors, and make sure they do not go "Too Far" in their training of recruits, and hurt or kill a recruit), and every Commanding Officer of The Perris Island and Camp Pendleton Recruit depots: Sunday, April 8th, 1956 something went awry and ever since the date and the name Staff Sergeant Matthew McKeon have tainted recruit depot Parris Island and Marine Corps history. Platoon 71 and the names of the recruits who died live on.

http://acoloneloftruth.blogspot.com/2012/07/marine-corps-recruit-training-and.html
(5)
Comment
(0)
Capt Lance Gallardo
Capt Lance Gallardo
>1 y
SSgt James Howerton - Hot in the summer and freezing in the winter! Remember that rattling sound of that metal fan at each end. I think some of us got used to that sound as a kind of white noise, and after a while the rattling of those metal fans at each end helped you get to sleep!
(0)
Reply
(0)
SSgt James Howerton
SSgt James Howerton
>1 y
Sir, when I went to 29 Palms the first time in 1977, we slept in hard-floored tents. There was no chow hall yet (at least where we were) and no heads. We were truly in the field, using slit-trenches and showered and shaved out of our helmets. The second time in I think 1979, they put us in Quonset huts. There were no fans in them yet. But I can't believe they would have made much difference since both times I was there was between June and August. Those huts got so hot a friend got a minor burn on one of his hands touching the outside on a Sunday (there was alcohol involved). The last time I was there was in the mid '80s and I couldn't believe the changes at the area they billeted us at. Heads with toilets and showers! Tents again this time but it was winter and they had a heating stove at each end (I think they ran on kerosene or some such liquid fuel) and they were really pretty toasty when it got cold at night. They also had a large chow hall with all my favorites: SOS, omelets, pancakes for morning chow and things like spaghetti for evening chow. It was hard to believe we were in the same place. I had always thought the first time I was there that "29 Stumps" or "The Stumps" was a brand new base but I found out later the Corps has owned that land for many years and a long time prior to my first trip. I remember on Saturday nights (during my first 2 deployments) they'd set a projector, and, using a white-sided tent as a screen we'd watch movies. They'd start out with something like a Tom and Jerry cartoon and all the Marines would be cracking up like little kids. Of course, most of them (us) were just kids, mostly 17 - young twenties. And they even supplied beer, which may have been 3.2 but nobody cared. You have to remember when I went through boot they actually included 2 or 3 cigarettes in each serving of C-Rats. My, how times have changed.
(1)
Reply
(0)
Capt Lance Gallardo
Capt Lance Gallardo
>1 y
SSgt James Howerton - Awesome stories. The Marine Corps has always (kind of Sick when you think about it) valued "living hard." I think with the AVF, creature comforts, when in garrison have become the norm rather than the exception. Most Marines then and now, expect to "suffer" in the field, with some exceptions. I dated a Crypto-Tech Female Warrant Officer for a short time (along time ago), and she used to love telling me how Crypto Tech Marines went to the field with air conditioned trailer, AC/DC and all the comforts of home (microwaves, portable TC, DVD Players, small refrigerators, the occasional six pack of beer), whatever ran off of Juice and was portable. I could not believe it. Most Marines today have air conditioned two man dorm rooms in Garrison as far as I know.
(1)
Reply
(0)
Cpl Douglas Loven
Cpl Douglas Loven
4 y
I was at 29 Palms in 98 for a CAX. The Quonset huts were still there. It was not to terrible, but the shower drain was clogged so there was about 6 inches of dirty water that a few 100 dirty Marines had used to wash their asses with. Good times!
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
Cpl Bernard Bates
2
2
0
If you looked at some of the battles the Marine Corp had you could understand why the training is hard, Physically and Mental. If recruits panic they can lose their life. I was 17 at parris island (59) If you did exactly as the DI said you would safe. All recruits had to jump in a pool 20 ft. deep weather we could swim or not. That is hard to do if you cant swim' The DI said if you cant swim we will pull you out, If you panic we might not. But they always did pull you out. We had live fire exercise MG, firing over our heads chest hi. with c-4 explosions going off around us crawling under barbwire. WE were warned not to panic or to stand up. Nobody did. I was scared but I always tried to do what the DI said. That's why being a Marine is forever. The EGA. means more to me than any patch.
(2)
Comment
(0)
SP5 Mark Kuzinski
SP5 Mark Kuzinski
>1 y
Great comments - thank you.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
SSgt James Howerton
2
2
0
I do know that deaths are pretty rare at P.I. There was an infamous incident before my time there (Jun, '77 - Sep '77) that involved recruits being marched into a marsh or stream and a recruit's death resulted, apparently from drowning, although I really don't know the details and they were never explained to me. I also know that there was a accidental shooting on the range just before I was there, apparently a recruit, during live fire, turned to ask a D.I. a question and his weapon discharged, killing the recruit to his side (which is why flipping a weapon's safety on immediately before removing one's weapon from the shoulder is drilled into each recruit's head over and over). This is a practice I still perform without conscious thought, every time I go to the range. I'm sure in the long history of the Corps there must have been other deaths, The Profession of Arms being a dangerous occupation which is one reason why it's not to be chosen as a job lightly. I'd especially have to believe that at least one death has occurred during the live fire that is shot over recruit's heads while crawling though the mud and under barbed wire. I know this was shown during a scene in the movie, "Jarhead", which is based on a Marine's actual experiences. It's always sad when a Service Person dies, but doubly so when killed by friendly fire.
(2)
Comment
(0)
Cpl Douglas Loven
Cpl Douglas Loven
4 y
When I was at MCT in Oct of 97 (ha, 21 years this month) there was a Marine walking around with a bandages on his head and ass.....yes his ass. When he was on the live grenade range he failed to clear the wall of the dugout it bounced off it and came back down landed in the pit, he and the instructor took some flying debris. He was lucky to be alive.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close