Posted on Feb 2, 2017
SGT Photographer/Owner
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Considering all the illegal immigrants in this country, do you think they should be able to use welfare or public assistance considering they aren't citizens and that many working Americans are denied welfare or public assistance.
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LTC Public Affairs Officer
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Absolutely not. The key word in your question is "illegal" which means that they should not be here in the first place.
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PO3 J.W. Nelson
PO3 J.W. Nelson
2 y
Sgt Thomas Proctor - Amen Brother !!
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MSgt Harold LaCoy
MSgt Harold LaCoy
2 y
Sgt Thomas Proctor - I agree with you but there never should be jobs that Americans won't do and there would not be if it weren't for the ease of collecting welfare.
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Sgt Thomas Proctor
Sgt Thomas Proctor
2 y
I agree, if a person has no skills and is only qualified to sweep floors and pick vegetables, then he should do that until he has enough initiative to better himself. Getting welfare benefits in this country is too easy. I know for a fact that illegals get food stamps and other benefits. I have a friend whose wife works in the social services office and she told him that one week the only people that came into the office were Hispanics.
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CPT Phil Bronner
CPT Phil Bronner
2 y
MSgt Harold LaCoy - If there are Americans ON welfare...and they WON'T take a job that an illegal does, or did....they should get no welfare. They can work or not...either way....the free ride is over!
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CPT Jack Durish
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A reasonable question easily answered. Hell no. The only right reserved to illegal aliens is welcome passage to the exit. Now, to be pragmatic, we could talk about having them earn a path to citizenship. I've already mentioned this in other discussion threads. Simply, let them serve the nation. One possibility is to work on building the wall in a Civilian Conservation Corps type of program.
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CPT Phil Bronner
CPT Phil Bronner
2 y
CW3 Walter Goerner - Pretty sure that "Illegal" means "Illegal". And you made my point...they are NO LONGER children. Which means they certainly are completely aware of their criminal status. They have made NO effort to leave the US, returning to their home country and applying to come here legally! I'm pretty sure that we owe American Citizens and American Children more than we do illegal aliens, regardless of how long they've been breaking the law. You are talking "policy"...I'm talking criminal law...it's important to know the difference.
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CW3 Walter Goerner
CW3 Walter Goerner
2 y
CPT Phil Bronner - Now I want you to sit and think. How are children that are accompanying illegal parents (who are criminal by choice) considered a criminal? By association? Your simplistic answer is to go home and apply for legal immigration...to what home? Just a country is not home. However, a program to address this with a path to legal status was made for those, now former, children and few took advantage of it. There's a difference there. I'm not talking policy, I'm talking about a program that gave them...not the parents that did it....a chance as they are now adults. You could even expand that to former children, now adults, illegally here by their parents that broke the law, to apply for legal immigration....not the parents. That's not allowed unless they have some sort of legal status. If denied, then they really need to leave to go back to their parent's country. It's the parents that are the criminals and the children can't be called criminals by association without choice of their parent's action. However with this program, and it should only be temporary, those former children must do what they can to correct their situation when they become adults. There, it's by their choice.
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CW3 Walter Goerner
CW3 Walter Goerner
2 y
CPT Phil Bronner - I've tried to put myself in a child's situation and then into their situation when they became an adult and how it can happen in some situations. My father's early life as an example. At 5 years old with my uncle who was 3 accompanied my Grandfather and his pregnant girlfriend from Germany, through Ellis Island in 1912. On what documents we could find is that Grandfather entered with his wife but that didn't make sense because we also found that Grandmother never left Chemnitz, Germany and there was another older brother Erik that never left Germany. A son was born to my Grandfather and his "wife", Helmut, a few months after they arrived in the U.S. and they all lived in Dover, NJ. Dad spoke very little about his father...nothing good, during Dad's life but what he did tell me was shocking. It turns out that Grandfather had a girlfriend in Germany and she had become pregnant. He asked Grandmother for a divorce which back then was very frowned upon and an embarrassment. She refused, so Grandfather kidnapped the two little children and with his pregnant girlfriend and a phony marriage certificate sailed to New York. In return for the divorce, Grandmother would get the children back. So she agreed to the divorce in exchange for getting her two sons back. After Grandfather got the divorce, he married his girlfriend. They all stayed in Dover until WWI was over and then one day in 1919, when Dad and his brother Otto came home from school they found the door locked and no one home. They sat on the steps outside until dark and a neighbor saw them and took them home and fed them dinner. They didn't know if their family were alive or dead. No one ever came back. Neither Dad nor his brother knew where they had lived in Germany, nor where to contact their mother. They were abandoned children. Instead of becoming wards of the State, the neighbor took them in. When Dad was 14 he quit school to go to work to help support the family working in a sweat shop hosiery mill. Not a U.S. citizen but allowed to stay in the U.S. because he could back then under sponsorship. Shortening this story a bit...he and Otto were almost deported in the late 30's because they did find out that Grandfather was a member of the Nazi party in Germany, and a Sturmbahnfueher SS (Major), Helmut was an officer in the Wehrmacht, as was Erik. It was because J. Edgar Hoover intervened to stop it from an earlier association. Dad was too old to enter the military and was allowed to work for Chrysler building tanks and Otto was allowed to enlist in the Coast Guard. Dad and Otto were allowed to be U.S. citizens in 1952. I was born a U.S. citizen in the U.S., my mother was a U.S. citizen, natural born and I was also a dual citizen with Dad having been a German citizen still at the time of my birth. Yes, my father was quite old for a family and I'm one of 9. I was born in 1951. As, I said before, my father rarely said anything about his father and my mother wouldn't allow it. I know of no contact with the German family when I was growing up. We were always very poor. It wasn't until a French woman, married to an AF Technical Sergeant that I knew while I was recovering from wounds at Tachikawa (sic) Japan told me that she read about a SS Major of the same name that had been the Deputy Commandant of Bergen-Belsen camp in Germany during the war and asked if I was any relation? His name was Johann Goerner. My Grandfather's name. I didn't find any information about that and I forgot about it until I came home years later and was visiting a school friend of mine at Ft. Dix, NJ who was in the Army. His mother-in-law was visiting also and when she saw my name on my uniform, she told me her story of being sent to that camp, her mother, father, sister and brother being killed there and the officer of the same name and did I have any photos? I went home in Northern NJ and asked Mom if she had any photos and I was shocked that she did. Only one. In her cedar chest. It was of Helmut's wedding just before the war. His wife was the only one in white, Helmut in uniform (a German Hauptmann) and there he was in his black uniform with the red swastika armband. I took that photo back to Ft. Dix to show to Rick's mother-in-law and wasn't prepared for the reaction. We had to take her to the hospital. She was crying and yelling, shaking when she saw the photo. She lived through the death camp and met and married a U.S. soldier after the war. Rick met and married their daughter. Rick was a childhood friend since kindergarten. Now interested, I found out that Johann Goerner, hid from capture until 1947. He was sentenced to life imprisonment. His imprisonment was commuted and he was released in 1955 but died shortly after of a stroke. It wasn't until 1984, when I was with the 2nd Signal Brigade in Mannheim, Germany that we had an Officer's dining in formal event with our German sister Brigade, that the German Brigade Commander came up to me and remarked that his first Commander, a Hauptmann (Captain) was of my same name at the end of WWII and did I have any relations in Germany back then. I told him I did but didn't know where they had lived or served. He told me his Commander was Helmut Goerner and I'd like to fall over. He told me that he was still alive and lived in Mannheim. He gave me the address and it was before I left Germany but I did find the house. Behind the little old lady that answered the door, was standing a little old man that looked like my father. It was my uncle. I had to PCS the next week but I told my older sister and gave her the address and she got to visit him before he died. Can you imagine the life of my father all those years having been abandoned, not knowing if his father or mother were dead or alive? Having come from a very wealthy German family and lived with nothing? After the war, no one had anything. Following in my father's footsteps. I'm 68 now and we have a 14 year old and a 3 year old.
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CPT Phil Bronner
CPT Phil Bronner
2 y
CW3 Walter Goerner - Foreign nationals in this country in violation of the law are, as defined IN our Immigration Law, "Illegal Aliens". You can bet from the earliest age, these children were schooled in how to act, what to say, etc. to protect their "illegal" status. The "program" is in violation of the law. Either we're a nation of laws...and the laws are to be obeyed, or not. You can't have it both ways, or it puts YOU in a position (or in the case of DACA, obama) of violating not only the immigration law, but the Constitution. If the law NEEDS to be changed, then we have a process for that, not to create a "policy" that violates the law based on presidential decree and a federal judiciary who violates their Constitutional limitations, and are creating "law" in their "opinions" out of whole cloth.
The Constitution, and our statutory laws are printed in black and white. There is no wiggle room. As a police officer, I never considered a drug dealer as an "undocumented pharmacist", or a rapist as an "undocumented sexual partner". A foreign national in this country in violation of our immigration laws has committed a crime, and, if you wish, as an adult is knowingly and willfully violating the law. Can't get much more cut and dried than that. With an estimated 22-30 million illegal aliens here, I think we've had enough of being taken for suckers.
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Maj John Bell
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Edited >1 y ago
The only assistance they should get is emergent healthcare, and only (edit) that which is necessary to sustain life until they can be deported.
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1SG Thomas Roman
1SG Thomas Roman
2 y
Maj John Bell - I agree with you completely, our first obligation is the preservation of life, regardless of who the person is, legal or not.
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Sgt Thomas Proctor
Sgt Thomas Proctor
2 y
After treatment their home country should be billed for the services rendered.
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Sgt Thomas Proctor
Sgt Thomas Proctor
2 y
CPO Bill Penrod - I have been there, while working as a construction consultant for E.I DuPont I had to go to a doctor. Before seeing the doctor I had to pay the fee up front. The U.S and it's emigration laws is a big joke with the Mexicans. They were always joking with me about feeling sick and slipping into the U.S. to see the doctor. They referred to their hospitals as slaughter houses.
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CPT Phil Bronner
CPT Phil Bronner
2 y
Sgt Thomas Proctor - You know they'd never pay the bill...LOL....cut their foreign aid accordingly....
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