Posted on Jun 28, 2017
SGT English/Language Arts Teacher
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SSgt Gary Andrews
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I used to hear similar remarks in the Marines........"he's not a "real" Marine......usually made in reference to someone who had never served in combat (of which I was one who didn't). As was explained to me in stark terms by one of my drill instructors (it's detailed in my book God Bless Chesty).......once you become a Marine, the Marine Corps owns your ass and will send you where they need you......your job is to follow orders and accomplish whatever mission you are given. Some were given combat missions, some were needed elsewhere......it wasn't our own choice. So I always felt that everyone who earned the right to the title........was a "real" one, regardless of what assignment they received. You wear the uniform, you are real.
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SSG Mannix Brooks
SSG Mannix Brooks
8 d
I have nothing but respect for that comment. I was a 19E M60A3 Tanker and happened to be in when the MOS was transitioning to 19K M1 Abrams which entailed freezing promotions for all that were not 19Ks. I chose to reenlist after my first 4 year stint as something else and was told after reenlisting for 68P (now) X-Ray Tech and was told two weeks before ETS'ing they were not accepting no more promotable E4s so I was given the choice to get out or choose something else and the only thing available was 74F (was 74B now 25B Information Tech). Right after the change all schools were closed and I was immediately assigned to an Engineer unit to deploy with after training at Fort Lewis to meet up with them in Fort Knox with my old MOS but designated a 19K without the 2-week familiarization training. I accepted that move on its the Army but a day before leaving Lewis to deploy I was told switch gears you are going to school. I missed that war. Fast forward 2004 my wife also a soldier had a stroke and I was held back with her from deploying with my unit in Germany from deploying. I left Germany and wound up in Fort Hood with 4th ID HQ and my wife in 1st Brigade. My wife got deployed (OIF 05-06) and I was held back because our BC said I was hand picked to stay back as cadre which wound up being little IT work and a whole lot of looking for the $17 million lost equipment from before I got there I was assigned to the unit. Months after being mad and dealing with looking for crap, escorted chapter cases and all the details they never told me about another NCO with the same rank and MOS showed up. They wanted to deploy that guy with three kids and a civilian wife within a month of being there. I fixed that and he stayed behind and I got myself deployed while pissing off my command who not only threatened to no deploy me but also got mad when I showed up threatening me to be a bus monitor. My boss gave me a job with the VTC section as the NCOIC in charge if two soldiers who wanted anything but to still be in and two contractors in other words hell. Before I left the 4 ID commander was awarding our section an official coin and the only formal recognition ceremony plus one NCO and one soldier being recognized as most improved. I did not get to go to war but took a section in shambles to being one of the best morale builders for MND-B by providing 1 on 1 VTCs between troops and families after mission hours, broadcasting all local HS graduations with families meeting afterwards and troops, thanks to the Navy, getting to see private births of their children at Bethesda and San Diego. As a former combat arms soldier and I still have 19K as my secondary MOS, I was one who always wanted to do what I came in to do but like everyone else I did what I was told (most times). I did my best to be there and being threatened to not be allowed to deploy while many people were trying to avoid it says something about me. After I retired in 2007 I spent all or parts of my time in Iraq or Afghanistan as an embedded contractor company all or parts of 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. Never got to see combat but I think I did a little bit of mission impact. It does make me mad though when some people say you were not a real soldier when no fault of my own I was chosen to do other things by people who outranked me by a whole lot. This is someone who never avoided anything that was ever assigned to them.
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SGT Michael Riser
SGT Michael Riser
6 d
Amen, Devil Dawg!
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SPC Steve Mason
SPC Steve Mason
3 d
PFC Howard Bryant Blackshear - As a 98G (Cryptolinguist and Voice Intercepter) I provided real time actionable intelligence. So if you ever got intelligence that an "enemy combatant" was heading your way and it maybe saved your life, that shit is "real." You are welcome, from a "real" REMF.
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SPC Luis Cedrez
SPC Luis Cedrez
3 d
Well said. I was stationed in Darmstadt Germany in the late 1980s and we never got sent into a war zone, but we dealt with terrorist trying to blow up our cars with USA plates, blowing up cars at our bases, etc. Not fun but I always have and will consider myself a "Real Soldier!"
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CPT Corporate Buyer
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As an infantryman myself I'd like to ask those people how far they think they would get without all those other soldiers doing their jobs. They'd run out of ammo/fuel/water/food/etc. pretty quickly. Not to mention they wouldn't get their CIB/medals/pay/insurance/etc. It's just stupid really.
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Cpl Marc Bayze
Cpl Marc Bayze
18 d
CPT (Join to see) no but I can supply you with a coloring book to atleast occupy your time with the pictures?!?!
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CPT Corporate Buyer
CPT (Join to see)
18 d
Cpl Marc Bayze Thanks, but I graduated from coloring books to oil paints and canvas. Lol
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Cpl Marc Bayze
Cpl Marc Bayze
18 d
CPT (Join to see) right on dude
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SFC Michael Bunch
SFC Michael Bunch
10 h
A truer response could not be made. The Infantry may be where the rubber hits the road..but it takes a whole lot of other "real" soldiers and service people to get the Infantry to road with the right equipment, supplies, support and services. It takes all of them so that when we hit the road fighting, the Infantry is successful. I typically hear the not a "real" Soldier, Sailor, or Marine from those that are E-0 to E-4 or O-1 to O-3. These are the ones that need to brag about what they are and how they are tougher or better than another field. It isn't until they start hitting middle to senior leadership positions that the "Big Picture" is developed and the realization that the Infantry is not alone. One more reason for why the "Army of One" slogan went away.
It reminds me of the old saying "For want of a Nail, The War was Lost.."
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SFC Intelligence Analyst
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126
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I tend to not listen to people like that. They usually have no clue what they're talking about. A soldier is a soldier. I don't know how one can be more "real" than another. Do we have imaginary soldiers running around the Army or something?

I've heard it too - it's usually combat arms telling support soldiers they aren't "real" soldiers.

My first deployment - I was a SPC. It was just me and my LT in the S2. The CSM's PSD PSG used to give me so much crap about being a "fobbit" and I didn't know what was going on outside the wire so how I could do any intel reports, etc. One day he comes in and he wants the SIGACTs for the day. I said "Nope sorry." (I think he was a SSG). He said "Why not?" I said "Well I'm just a fobbit. I don't know what is really going on so I can't give you anything that will help, can I?"
He kind of glared at me and I did give him the information but still - I got tired of it. Yes I was a fobbit. I was on the FOB. Omg I must not have ever been a real soldier during both my deployments. I went out on as many patrols as I could. My LT wouldn't let me go out very much. (Who would do the work?). Everyone can't be outside the FOBs. Sorry.

If someone wants to act like they are big crap they can. Usually the ones who boast the most didn't really do much at all during their time.
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PO3 Michael MacKay
PO3 Michael MacKay
1 mo
Well, I am pretty sure I am not a soldier. :)
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Cpl Andrew Kotcher
Cpl Andrew Kotcher
1 mo
pretty much if you arent a 0311 grunt who has to have the crayons taken away from them.
then you arent real to them.
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SSG John Dunshee
SSG John Dunshee
1 mo
CPL Joseph Elinger - Oh, yeah. I stayed for two tours, the only way I survived was by getting married.
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CPL Joe Briggs
CPL Joe Briggs
9 h
Correct, as a Cpl. in command of a fire squad outside the wire lost it's appeal very quickly
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