Posted on Feb 22, 2016
Sgt Justin DavisCrowe
15.3K
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I have been waiting for almost two years for a service dog to help with my PTSD/TBI. I am looking for opinions of those who own a service dog to see if it truely helps.
Posted in these groups: Screen shot 2015 03 15 at 2.13.20 pm PTSD392025c1 DogsDog training logo Dog TrainingTbi logo TBI
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Responses: 17
TSgt Thomas Hopper
11
11
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I dont have a dog and laugh as you will, but I have chickens. They may not like me, but they are a comfort to watch and help me focus. Plus, the added benifits, I get fresh eggs and some extra cash. I sell the eggs cheaply too, so that others can afford a little goodness in their diet and the money goes back into the birds food. I have been taken care of, so I try to pay it forward so others can enjoy.
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SGT Eddie Brown
SGT Eddie Brown
6 y
Naw brother no laughing here whatever helps you deal and focus is wonderful brother congrats on having this ability and recognizing the assist
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PO2 Albert Robbins
PO2 Albert Robbins
>1 y
Stay close to the chicks. Sooner or later, you'll get one that is "different" and will become as attached to you as any dog. You'll have a house foul sitting on your shoulder.
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TSgt Thomas Hopper
TSgt Thomas Hopper
>1 y
PO2 Albert Robbins - I already do, but it is also do to a birth defect that would keep her from eating normally. She has what is called "scissor beak". Her jaw is off-set and has to eat from a bin. She is over a year old and, despite it all, is thriving. All I can say is, "Thank God for ceramic titled floors!"
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PO2 Albert Robbins
PO2 Albert Robbins
>1 y
TSgt Thomas Hopper See? You already have a special bird. Changes the way you see the feathered ones, doesn't it? Good for you.
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CAPT Kevin B.
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D31a1739
The answer is results will vary a lot. We have a Certified Therapy Dog who does work with PTSD, neuropsych, and physical rehab. It was a start for many to see what happens. PTSD is on a continuum. At one end, a nonjudgmental companion works well. At the other end, a highly trained for a set of specific needs solution is required. Obviously quite a cost difference and the more towards the later, the more professional help needed in creating the solution. So the I want what that person has solution isn't usually correct. You need a solution that works for you.

That said, any pet, including TSgt Thomas Hopper chickens, have one thing in common. They turn your attention from inwards to outwards. Their livelihood is totally dependent on you. That in itself is a big step. We trained up a service dog for my son who cues on escalating anxiety levels. Again, turn out, not in. He's at a level where he doesn't need to take her everywhere but is sure good to have around on bad days. I suggest anyone with PTSD who wants to check into a pet solution also proactively work on selection, training, etc. to reduce cost and more efficiently get through the process while tailoring the results. Sitting back and waiting on a solution to be delivered has its own set of problems.

Now wife has two Anatolian/Great Pyrenees pups what we'll start training. Nearing 80 pounds at 6 months, I'm beginning to think we'll have Therapy Bears.
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CAPT Kevin B.
CAPT Kevin B.
1 y
96aa5501
It it with sadness that I report the passing of Beckham at 14 years of age. He worked skillfully to about 12 1/2 years, mostly doing light level stuff like children's reading programs. That said, I'd like to introduce you to Dakota. He's a Flat Coated Retriever who will be following in Beckham's pawsteps. 12 weeks old (picture at 10 weeks) and already 2/3rds house broke. Very loving and attentive. It's a lot of work to properly train up a Certified Therapy Dog. But the work they love is repaid immeasurably by the love they get back.
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SGT Cody Skinner
8
8
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I currently do not have a Service Dog, but I have done a lot of research and I am in the process of getting one. I reached out a lot of Charities that train PTSD Service Dogs for free when they have funding to ask about the process and how it works. It seems like every one of them has a waiting list due to lack of funding. I found a few that will move you to the front of the list if you are willing to pay for the training at cost out of pocket. Even paying for it at cost it is still around $3,000 to get a dog trained and certified. My Wife and I are at the point where I'm tired of the fighting and struggle so I did a GoFund me page to raise a portion of the funding needed to get my dog and complete the Training. It didn't raise 100% of the funds so I will still have to save a little more money to complete the process. But GoFund helped to get me moving in the right direction and it also got me in touch with a lot of Buddies that were or know K9 Trainers that are going to help me with bonding and getting a good solid basic training for the puppy.

I have an Alaskan Malamute that is not trained as a Service Dog, but he is a Dog that has the a very strong pack mentality. I can't always take him with me but anytime I can take him places I do because having him there makes me more comfortable. Yes, he is big and looks like a wolf which gives me some stand off distance from people and keeps them out of my personnel space, but allows me to still visit. If I am forced to sit where I can't see all around me, it's crowded, or it's dark he automatically sits or lays down behind me. He growls when ever someone approaches which lets me address the person and not get surprised / scared by them.
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