Posted on Apr 17, 2018
2LT Infantry Officer
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As per the ARTB website http://www.benning.army.mil/infantry/ARTB/ Ranger school had a 33.1% grad rate for 2017. This is far from the historic average near 50%. Is there any specific reason for this? I know RTTs are now a drop event but that can't be the only issue.
Posted in these groups: P240 RangerTRADOC
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COL Charles Williams
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2LT (Join to see) 12-85, my class, was about 40% left at the end; I thought the historic attrition rate was closer to 60%?
I would say today, it is because many more are weak minded now.
I now deal with HS kids daily, and I have never heard so many excuses for why one can't do PT. I have had 7 kids graduate and attempt RASP, and only 2 lasted; and only one of those two made to Ranger School and graduated. Those 7 were all exceptionally physically fit and capable, but they all did not really want it.
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SPC Erich Guenther
SPC Erich Guenther
>1 y
I would lean towards this explanation. Though I never went to Ranger school my first test o n the Civilian side after ETS was the EDS System Engineer Development program. The program recruited from a largely Veteran pool and the terms were sign a promissory note, if you do not pass the class, you pay back the costs of the class and your fired. So I was on a dorm room floor of mostly Engineers when EDS came to my college campus. Most of them thought "what if I fail?" due to the promissory note vs "what if I pass?". So I got the job as a non-Engineering student because about 99% of the Engineering students were too afraid to apply. Their loss. I also see this a lot on the civilian side of the fence. People do not realize an opportunity even though it is right on the end of their nose because of some aspect in their way that makes them overly nervous. BTW, EDS was forced to tear up all the promissory notes before I graduated the program due to a legal challenge.........of course from someone who failed the course.

Even the job I have now, most folks did not want to apply due to the extensive background check (what if they fail the check and are terminated?). This one actually made me think a little. If your too afraid of a background check..........whats in your past? Oh well.
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2LT Infantry Officer
2LT (Join to see)
>1 y
Thank you for the reply. That makes sense, it just seems that the graduation rate has dropped significantly year after year. 2006 had a 56.2% grad rate and it just seems to drop from there. I would like to think changes to the school had something to do with this apart from the general mindset of the student.
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COL Charles Williams
COL Charles Williams
>1 y
2LT (Join to see) - It could be unfortunately, that folks are getting really getting softer and weaker...
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LTC Christopher Hills
LTC Christopher Hills
5 mo
I looked online and found in 1980 the GRADUATION rate was 64%. Then by 2010-2011 the grad rate was 42%. If it is now 33% that is complete incompetence. Either the selection process to let them in school is broken or the standards have continued to get so difficult that nobody can graduate. But the job of the ranger school isn’t to make them elite (that is for the battlefield) the job of the school is to put out ranger qualified officers and NCO’s. If they are NOT doing that, then everything needs to be reevaluated from selection, to training, to staff and alleged standards. Since the creation of the course in 1951, the overall average grad rate is right at 50%. So we are doing something wrong.
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SFC Inprocessing
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I’m not currently Ranger qualified, but I’m stationed at 6th RTB and I will say this...

If the quality and discipline level of Soldiers decline with the regular Army, so shall the Ranger population.That’s what has happened during the last decade. It’s as simple as that, Sir.

I definitely recommend attending the course, especially as an Infantry Officer, but it really is that simple.

Good luck!
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CPT Student
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I am Ranger and Ranger Instructor qualified. I worked at the Ranger and Training Assessment Course at Fort Benning. I can speak a bit to this. But the 50% success rate is pretty rare. I can't say I have seen it that high. My class back in 2014 was at 33 percent. There are a few reasons as to why it is that low. The proficiency of soldiers today is something that needs to be improved. At times soldiers go to ranger school and they are not familiar with infantry tactics and weapon systems. This is especially the case with non-combat arms soldiers. RTT came about due to soldiers in Ranger School not having the acknowledge to function weapon systems. If you are Ranger Qualified you would be expected to know how to use those infantry weapons. That is just one issue. When you go beyond that Ranger School is open to all MOS's. If believe if you just had infantry it would be higher. When they opened it up to pretty much everyone you added soldiers that were not familiar with small unit tactics or infantry operations. They are going to be hit hard. The school doesn't change but it has to figure out how to maintain a standard of proficiency. Over time they will adjust the training to reflect what is coming to them from the force.
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2LT Infantry Officer
2LT (Join to see)
>1 y
Thank you for the response. That makes. These are the numbers I'm looking at http://www.benning.army.mil/infantry/ARTB/content/pdf/Ranger%20School%20Performance%20for%20FY16.pdf . Thes one I found for 2008-2010 were all over 50%.
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MAJ Infantry Officer
MAJ (Join to see)
2 y
1LT I’d like to pick your brain a little about the course.
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LTC Christopher Hills
LTC Christopher Hills
5 mo
The overall average since 1951 is right at 50%. In 1980 they graduated 64%. In ‘14 it was 42%. It is inexcusable that they are graduating anywhere lower than 50%. Either we are not preparing soldiers or we are not selecting the right soldiers to attend or the cadre and standards need to be reviewed. But the job of the school is to put out ranger trained soldiers. Not doing so simply wastes money and manpower. It is possible that branches (or units) need to put together train up courses. Hard to say. There was a time (Vietnam) when all officers attended, but by the 80’s it was nearly impossible for non-combat arms officers to get it... now it is open again. That is all about budget.
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