Posted on Jul 31, 2020
MSgt B Grimes
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What are your thoughts given some basic info? Fraud, Criminal Intent, PTSD & psychology.
An Army infantry soldier completes a first term 4 year enlistment, excited following 9/11. Possibly serves only one overseas tour, and never fires his weapon in combat. Gets out of Army following enlistment and joins Army Guard. Within first year of guard duty (upon orders for overseas tour) claims PTSD threatens to kill his comrades. Is released from duty.
Member has tried for 12 years to get benefits, and finally receives 100% disability. Claims to his family that his PTSD disease is cured. Does not follow psychologists prescriptions, as they are not really needed.
Was member fit for duty when enlisting in the Army Guard? Or did this member fraudulently join having pre-existing condition?
Can this member have concealed carry and go hunting, when he claims PTSD for gunfire?
would you consider this member to be defrauding the government and taxpayer?
Soldier has lied to family members claiming to be heroic sniper, only to reveal as lies later, having never fired his weapon in actual combat. Possibly used similar lies to VA psychologist.
How would you approach situation? VA does not seem to care, and does not offer path for investigation.
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Responses: 291
SSgt Marvin Cole
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Every veteran who has served in a combat zone suffers from PTSD at some level. Some very small, some very large.

Some Veterans bring their Anxieties and Mental Issues with them when they enter the military. The nature of Service Connected simply implies that whatever that person did in the Military resulted in less than maximum participation in the workforce.

It is way to complicated to find simple solutions. The process of obtaining a PTSD disability is strenuous and goes thru several level to ultimately reach the level of disability.

War Zones changes people.

I am 90% Service Connected, paid at 100% because I am unemployable. The process I went thru was filled with Psychiatrist, Psychologist, and Counseling visits. Immensely helpful. I function well today, because I do not have to worry about finances. I do not have to worry about medical care. I do not believe I could do it without my VA disability.

You cannot always tell what's in a book by it's cover. Judging others without the benefit of all the information is just rumor mongering and just being a busy body. The professionals in the VA have done their job! None of us, should judge them without having the proper credentials.
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CPT Steve Hammond
CPT Steve Hammond
2 mo
This coming from a Wingnut? PUHLEEZE. Your greatest threat was running out of sodas or the AC in your tent goes out.
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TSgt Mario Guajardo
TSgt Mario Guajardo
2 mo
CPT Steve Hammond - yeah, thanks for the support, thought we were on the same team
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Sgt Judy Leonard
Sgt Judy Leonard
1 mo
CPT Steve Hammond - you’re not a doctor and you didn’t serve in his shoes.
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Cpl Gunner Stout
Cpl Gunner Stout
1 mo
CPT Steve Hammond - Guess you never spent any time in DaNang ("rocket city"), Chu Lai, Bien Hoa, etc. there Captain - lots of Marine "wing-wipers" on the wall in DC (a couple I knew personally). Your comment is out of line and not worthy of an "officer and a gentleman".
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CSM Darieus ZaGara
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No offense but there is certainly a lot of he said, she said, and speculation. As for PTSD, many pepp op or are affecting by things in life differently. It could be that he made up stories about his experience in order to justify his level of PTSD, not wishing to admit that the environment itself got to him. As for telling his family one thing only to recant is a classic sign that he may be dealing with deeper issues, I.e. there is nothing wrong with me, you have nothing to fear I mad me it all up. This is done, in some instances, to take the concern from the family. As for not taking meds, that too is a common issue.

The psychologists at the VA have the distinct advantage of accessing his entire military and medical record, they know where he was, for how long, and in most cases what he experienced.

If he is legit, then his Family should ask to attend a family counseling session with the VA in order to learn how to support him, he’ll he is troubled either way, PTSD or not. So money aside he needs help. Also, the VA reassess all levels of compensation about every five years until about 55. They will also review over 55 if the condition is one that is thought to be repairable. So, if he is a fraud he will be found out, and removed or reduced.

So my first thought would be the benefit of the doubt, if he won’t attend a family session, I recommend his loved ones seek counseling and read up on how to help and cope with him. Soldiers are very adapt at masking their feelings. God Bless.
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Sgt Judy Leonard
Sgt Judy Leonard
1 mo
SPC Andrew Toombs - does it really matter?
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Sgt Cullen Smith
Sgt Cullen Smith
1 mo
SPC Andrew Toombs - So what IS the right meds. I've been on dang near anti-depressant made and either have bad side effects or it just don't work.
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1SG Michael Brooks
1SG Michael Brooks
27 d
Sgt Cullen Smith - I have had Depression / Anxiety for many yrs after a bad parachute accident (Loss of conciousness x 3hrs). I tried 5 or 6 antidepressants. None have really worked. My Psychiatrist recomended Trans-cranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). I had 36 treatments, then 20 more treatments. The result is no more anti-depressants and a much better life thn I had been living. Check and see if it may be right for you. (the treaments are not easy....I wanted to stop at the halfway point... so glad I hung in there.)
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Sgt Cullen Smith
Sgt Cullen Smith
27 d
Thank you. Will look into it.
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SFC Intelligence Analyst
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90
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Edited 2 y ago
Why do you care? How does this affect you personally?

Also PTSD = Post Traumatic Stress Disorder...so anyone can suffer from it if they suffered from trauma. If one is in a serious car accident, sexual assault, etc, you can get PTSD. Childhood abuse, domestic violence. The list goes on. People need to stop thinking you only get PTSD in combat.
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Cpl Gunner Stout
Cpl Gunner Stout
1 mo
TSgt Don Dollinger -
After seeing $6T we didn't have spent last year, most going to people who didn't "earn" it or need it and lots of that to people who weren't even eligible, I no longer subscribe to the notion that need is somehow impaired by fraud - if the government thinks they need more money, they just print more money. The government's unofficial position is that it costs more to weed out fraud than the fraud itself costs, and I didn't come to this cynical view easily. Just for the record, the entire military portion of the 2022 federal budget (including the VA) is 19%, although it is the Federal government's primary constitutional responsibility - so I have a hard time justifying a lot of consternation over one veteran who might be getting some money that another veteran suspects he didn't earn.
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TSgt Don Dollinger
TSgt Don Dollinger
28 d
Cpl Gunner Stout We will have to agree to disagree. My opinion is that those who turn a blind eye to possible fraud are part of the problem, not part of the solution.
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Cpl Gunner Stout
Cpl Gunner Stout
26 d
TSgt Don Dollinger - The "solution" won't be found in going after someone you *suspect* might be guilty of fraud. What will be found is a lot of embarrassment for you when you discover your accusation is based only on your own ignorance of someone else's situation. I've been on the back side of that scenario and enjoyed the hell out of the accusers sputtering apology, at which point I dismissed him with a pointed expletive. Mind your *own* business and you'll live a far more enjoyable and respected life.
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TSgt Don Dollinger
TSgt Don Dollinger
18 d
Cpl Gunner Stout Failure to investigate and/or even question it when there are Red Flags due to the possibility of being embarrassed is the problem. It makes it easy for frauds to game the system. If he's truly disabled then a cursury investigation will bear that out. In the scenario presented there was not just 1 red flag but many. Stick your head in sand, its an affront to those who are truly disabled.
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