Posted on Feb 16, 2015
TSgt Terry Hudson
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Some SrA don't step up to the plate when it comes to being a Senior Airman. What do you think the problem is?
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A1C Postal Clerk
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I agree with LTC Strickland. I have SrA as coworkers where I work, and trust me, there are some who are more laid-back, and some who naturally step up more to the plate more than others.

Given that they still are Airmen, it's natural for them to be in that mindset. Just try to remember that every SrA brings something different to the table in terms of skill, temperament, and budding leadership styles. Believe me, I have a hard time remembering this, even when it comes to my peers.
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SGM Brigade Operations (S3) Sergeant Major
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Very well said A1C (Join to see) ! Be one of the ones that naturally step up!
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TSgt Terry Hudson
TSgt Terry Hudson
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Agreed, don't be one of the SrA who see themselves as just an Airman!
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SGM Brigade Operations (S3) Sergeant Major
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Edited >1 y ago
TSgt Terry Hudson

I am currently stationed on a forward deployed airbase. Maybe it's just me or maybe it's the way the Air Force is set up but, I don't see a lot of Air Force NCOs stepping up. I see a lot of MSgts hanging out with junior Airmen and I almost never see any SSgts or TSgts making any corrections on anyone, much less setting the example. I mean the mustaches and makeup are getting out of control around here.

I am not bashing on the Air Force by any means but I definitely see a big difference between Army and Marine NCOs compared to Air Force NCOs. Seriously, unless a CMSgt makes a correction nobody polices themselves. They are very professional when I address them (even though they call me sir) but look at me like I am from another planet if I tell them to fix themselves.

One of our basic responsibilities as NCOs and leaders is to enforce our services regulations. It is very important to maintain good order and discipline.
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TSgt Terry Hudson
TSgt Terry Hudson
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SGM (Join to see) i know exactly what you're talking about and can tell you exactly what the problem is. In the Air Force some jobs require enlisted to work hand and hand with commissioned or have NCO's doing the same work as junior enlisted (mainly flyers, non-combat operators, and medical). That breaks that wall that is up between the NCOs and JE hence creating those unprofessional relationships. It's not the Air Force's fault it's the NCO's fault for not upholding the standards. As soon as I was promoted to E4 I started separating myself from E3's and below and now to I am a select/promotable for E5 I'm separating myself from E4's. I know exactly where you're coming from with this sir, how can E4 step up when the NCO's aren't setting the example of what they should be stepping up to!
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SMSgt Bryan Raines
SMSgt Bryan Raines
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CSM Oldsen, One of the problems I see within the AF is the lack of NCO/SNCO traditions that the other services have. It also bleeds up and down the Chain. I had a problem with an Air Force officer, who was also a prior Army officer, on my last assignment before retiring. I was an E-8 (was the senior enlisted person in the squadron and worked directly for the 0-6 squadron commander) and the officer was an 0-4. When I asked the officer if they would have talked to the equivalent Army rank the way they just talked to me, there was a look of horror on their face and they replied that there was no way they would even think about doing so. I asked why did they think it was okay to address me in that manner and they oh it's because we are in the Air Force. Needless to say they spent some quality time with my boss and the officer in question became much more respectful to SNCOs. By the way all Air Force personnel are taught to address those superior in rank as Sir or Ma'am as a matter of respect.
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CMSgt Tom Qualls
CMSgt Tom Qualls
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If it takes a CMSgt to make that kind of correction, that doesn't speak well of AF leadership, Officer and NCO at this installation. I won't generalize, but I do know that during my time, NCO's were pretty good at policing themselves up and down the chain. On the enlisted side, it may start with the Chief, but definitely shouldn't end there...
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LTC Jason Strickland
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Whether it's an Airman - a Marine, a Soldier, or a Sailor - the qualities we want exhibited in our future leaders begin to present themselves right away. TSgt Terry Hudson, I think it's okay that some "step up to the plate" and some don't. As a leader, I want those that have the passion, the tenacity, and the drive to emerge among their peers.
Sure, our military is teaching everyone how to become a leader and instilling various attributes associated with patriotism and selfless service, but early on in a military career, it's okay to have some take the initiative and (most of) the others not. It will all work out in the end. Thanks for the question and initiating the discussion!
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